Monthly Archives: August 2019

Taxpayers with Significant Tax Debts Can Lose Their U.S. Passports

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
August 21, 2019

 

Taxpayers with Significant Tax Debts Can Lose Their U.S. Passports

 

Ever heard of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015?  Well, under FAST the IRS has the authority to notify the State Department of taxpayers certified as owing the federal government.  A significant tax debt is currently defined as a delinquent tax bill of $52,000 or moreThe FAST requires the State Department to revoke the delinquent taxpayer’s U.S. passport and limit the taxpayer’s ability to travel outside the United States.

 

Taxpayer’s who intend to travel outside the United States must negotiate with the IRS to get the delinquent tax certification lifted

 

Taxpayer’s who intend to travel outside the United States must negotiate with the IRS to get the delinquent tax certification lifted.  Until that happens the taxpayer could become stranded outside of the U.S. with a revoked passport, or be blocked receiving a passport for the first time or on renewal leaving them unable to travel out of the country for any reason.

 

taxpayers who have to travel abroad must responsibility deal with their federal tax obligations long before they need to travel; because other than option one, above (paying the tax debt in full), the suggested options take months and some of them even take years to resolve in negotiations with the IRS

 

The IRS has identified several ways taxpayers can avoid having the IRS notify the State Department of their seriously delinquent tax debt as follows:

  1. Paying the tax debt in full;
  2. Paying the tax debt timely under an approved installment agreement;
  3. Paying the tax debt timely under an accepted offer in compromise;
  4. Paying the tax debt timely under the terms of a settlement agreement with the Department of Justice;
  5. Having a pending collection due process appeal with a levy; or
  6. Having collection suspended because a taxpayer has made an innocent spouse election or requested innocent spouse relief.

The practical tiptaxpayers who have to travel abroad must responsibility deal with their federal tax obligations long before they need to travel;  because other than option one, above (paying the tax debt in full),  the suggested options take months and some of them even take years to resolve in negotiations with the IRS.

The following types of taxpayers have been exempted from the delinquent taxpayer certification requirements under FAST:

  • Taxpayers in bankruptcy proceedings;
  • Identity Theft Victims;
  • Taxpayers whom the IRS has deemed non-collectible;
  • Taxpayers located within a federal declared disaster area;
  • Taxpayers with pending Installment Agreement request;
  • Taxpayers with pending Offer in Compromise with the IRS; or
  • Taxpayers with an IRS accepted adjustment that will satisfy the debt in full; and
  • Taxpayer’s serving in a combat zone is not exempt from the certification rules, but the certification is postponed while they do their tour of duty in the combat zone.

 

Taxpayers with plans to travel abroad simply need to be aware of the fact that their plans can be totally upended if they owe the federal government more$52,000 or more in back taxes.

 

Taxpayers with plans to travel abroad simply need to be aware of the fact that their plans can be totally upended if they owe the federal government $52,000 or more in back taxes.  The $52,000 could be owed on personal income taxes or business taxes where the individual taxpayer has been found be to be a responsible party, such as in payroll taxes with respect to the trust fund penalty that usually applies to delinquent taxpayer who owns the business or even employees of the business responsible for deciding what vendors and suppliers get paid and when.  Also the $52,000 certification threshold can be reached for a single tax period or multiple tax periods combined.  Example No 1, the taxpayer owes the IRS $2,000 for 2009, $14, 000 for 2015, and $40,000 for 2018.  In this example the taxpayer is seriously delinquent and the IRS under FAST can certify them as seriously delinquent to the U.S. State Department.  Example No. 2, the taxpayer owns a windmill manufacturing company with twenty employees; their business slowed to a whisper in the third quarter 2019 and the business owner decided to pay office rent, utilities, employees and suppliers and not the IRS payroll taxes.  The IRS learns of this decision and finds the owner the responsible party under the germane tax section and access a $52,000 trust fund penalty on the owner.  In this case, the owner/taxpayer could be certified by the IRS as a seriously delinquent taxpayer under FAST.  The owner’s passport could be revoked or their passport renewal could be denied by the U.S. State Department.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

FBAR

Por: Coleman Jackson, abogado, contador público certificado
03 agosto 2019

FBAR

La Ley de Información de Divisas y Transacciones en el Extranjero de 1970, también conocida como la Ley de Secreto Bancario, requiere que los residentes, ciudadanos y empresas con cuentas bancarias en el extranjero y algunos otros activos en el extranjero de EE. UU., reporten esos intereses a la Red de Delitos Financieros anualmente en el Formulario 114 antes del 15 de abril del año siguiente.  El Formulario 114 es el Informe de Banco Extranjero y Cuentas Financieras o (FBAR). La Ley de Secreto Bancario tiene una serie de requisitos de información que se aplican a las instituciones financieras, así como a aquellas personas con intereses en activos extranjeros. Los requisitos de mantenimiento de registros e informes que se aplican a los titulares de cuentas extranjeros se detallan en 31 U.S.C. Sección. 5414. En el formulario 114, el FBAR debe presentarse electrónicamente a través del sitio web de la red de archivos electrónicos de la Ley de secreto bancario. La Red de Delitos Financieros es una agencia del Tesoro de los Estados Unidos, pero no es el Servicio de Impuestos Internos. Estas son dos agencias separadas bajo el Departamento del Tesoro de los Estados Unidos.

 

La Ley de Secreto Bancario en 31 U.S.C. Sección. 5414 también requiere que los contribuyentes con cuentas bancarias extranjeras divulguen esas cuentas en sus declaraciones de impuestos federales anuales.

 

La Ley de Secreto Bancario en 31 U.S.C. Sección. 5414 también requiere que los contribuyentes con cuentas bancarias extranjeras divulguen esas cuentas en sus declaraciones de impuestos federales anuales. El Formulario 1040 del IRS en la línea 7a del Anexo B pregunta específicamente si el contribuyente tiene un interés o una autoridad signataria sobre una cuenta bancaria extranjera. Una respuesta afirmativa a esta pregunta en el Anexo B requiere que el contribuyente identifique el país de la cuenta y algunos otros detalles. El hecho de que un contribuyente no marque la casilla “sí” cuando tiene un interés de un banco extranjero o una autoridad signataria sobre un activo extranjero aumenta seriamente su riesgo legal porque los tribunales han dicho que la falta de “marcar la casilla” constituye una violación intencional de la Ley de Secreto Bancario. La falta de lectura de la declaración se ha considerado insuficiente para evitar la responsabilidad en virtud de la Ley. Evitar el conocimiento de los requisitos de Actos no ha sido un plan exitoso. Los tribunales federales de todo el país han abordado estas diversas defensas y han encontrado que carecen de peso.

 

Cuando una violación de la Ley de Secreto Bancario no es intencional, la multa de FBAR por no revelar el interés financiero en cuentas bancarias extranjeras, valores o otros activos financieros se limita a $ 10,000.

 

Cuando una violación de la Ley de Secreto Bancario no es intencional, la multa de FBAR por no revelar el interés financiero en cuentas bancarias extranjeras, valores o otros activos financieros se limita a $ 10,000. Este límite solo se aplica a las violaciones no intencionales del estatuto FBAR. Si no se marca correctamente la casilla y no se revela a un preparador de declaraciones de impuestos la existencia de cuentas bancarias en el extranjero o otros activos en el extranjero es extremadamente probable que se considere una violación intencional de la Ley. La multa permitida por la Ley de Secreto Bancario por una violación intencional es igual al mayor de $ 100,000 o el 50% del saldo más alto en la cuenta en el momento de la violación. También hay penalidades criminales por la violación de la Ley de Secreto Bancario si un contribuyente es juzgado y condenado en virtud de la Ley. Según la ley, el Servicio de Impuestos Internos tiene 6 años desde la fecha de la violación para evaluar la multa de FBAR y pueden demandar al contribuyente o al patrimonio del contribuyente para cobrar las multas. Tenga en cuenta que las sanciones impuestas por FBAR no desaparecen con la muerte del contribuyente.

 

Nuevamente, si el IRS impone las multas de FBAR y el contribuyente se niega a pagarlas, el gobierno de los EE.UU. puede intentar cobrar las multas en un tribunal federal de conformidad con 31 EE. UU. Sección. 5321 (b) (1).

 

Nuevamente, si el IRS impone las multas de FBAR y el contribuyente se niega a pagarlas, el gobierno de los EE.UU. puede intentar cobrar las multas en un tribunal federal de conformidad con 31 EE. UU. Sección. 5321 (b) (1). El gobierno debe demostrar ante el tribunal la preponderancia de la evidencia de que (a) el contribuyente es un residente, ciudadano o entidad comercial de los EE. UU. sujeto a la Ley de Secreto Bancario, (b) el contribuyente tenía una obligación de informar conforme a la Ley de Secreto Bancario y fracasó para cumplir con la obligación de informar, y (c) la naturaleza de la violación del contribuyente en términos de violación no intencional o intencional del estatuto, y (d) el contribuyente no ha pagado oportunamente la multa impuesta. El contribuyente debe alegar y probar cualquier defecto en el estatuto de limitaciones en el caso del gobierno. Los casos FBAR, en general, son casos basados ​​en hechos. Los contribuyentes ganan algunos y pierden algunos.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432