Author Archives: Coleman Jackson

Federal Courts Clarify Standard for Proving Taxpayer’s Willful Violation of Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR)

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
February 13, 2019

Federal Courts Clarify Standard for Proving Taxpayer’s Willful Violation of Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR)

 

United States citizens, lawful permanent residence and certain other persons that are classified under 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5311 and promulgated Regulations must file with the Financial Crimes Network annually a Report of Foreign Bank Account, Form 114.  The U.S. persons covered under the disclosure law must file the report each year for foreign bank accounts exceeding $10,000 in the prior calendar year whether it is a single account or an aggregate of accounts.  If the $10,000 threshold is met, FBAR reporting requirements are triggered.

 

Form 114 FBAR reporting

 

The amount of the FBAR penalty depends upon whether the taxpayer’s violation was willful or non-willful. What is willfulness in the FBAR context?  The general consensus developed in the courts is that the term, ‘willful’ “denotes that which is intentional, or knowing, or voluntary, as distinguished from accidental, and that it is employed to characterize conduct marked by careless disregard whether or not one has the right so to act.”            Wehr v. Burroughs Corp., 619 F.2d 276, 281 (3d Cir. 1980).  A taxpayer has willfully violated 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5314 when they knowingly or recklessly fails to file a FBAR.  A person commits a reckless violation of the FBAR statute by engaging in conduct that violates an objective standard:  action entailing an unjustifiably high risk of harm that is either known or so obvious that it should be known.  The Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Bedrosian v. U.S., 2018 (3rd Cir. 2018) that

 

This holding is in line with other courts that have addressed civil FBAR penalties, see, e.g. United States v. Williams, 489 F. App’x 655, 658 (4th Cir. 2012) as well as our prior cases addressing civil penalties assessed by the IRS under the tax laws, see e.g., United States v. Carrigan, 31 F. #d 130, 134 (3d Cir. 1994). 

 

In Kimble v. U.S., 2018 (Fed, Cl. 2018), the court ruled that the taxpayer recklessly disregarded her duty to report foreign accounts because she failed to review her tax returns for accuracy and falsely represented in her tax return that she did not have any foreign bank accounts.  Note that Schedule B of Form 1040 at line 7(a) specifically asks taxpayer’s whether or not they have any foreign bank accounts. The question format is ‘yes or no’, and if it is answered ‘yes’, it leads to a series of additional inquiries with respect to the foreign bank accounts.

 

The civil penalties for a FBAR violation

 

The civil penalties for a FBAR violation are codified in 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5321(a)(5).  The maximum penalty for a non-willful violation is $10,000 per occurrence.  The maximum penalty for a willful violation of the FBAR statute is the greater of $100,000 or 50% of the balance in the unreported foreign account at the time of the violation.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Acción civil por parte del contribuyente en negación o revocación de casos de pasaporte de Estados Unidos

Por Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Certificado Publico
01/22/2019

Acción civil por parte del contribuyente en negación o revocación de casos de pasaporte de Estados Unidos

 

El Congreso de los Estados Unidos ha autorizado la negación o revocación de pasaportes Estadounidenses a los contribuyentes con serias deudas de impuestos delincuentes. Esta autorización esta codificada en la Sección 7345 del Código de Ingresos Internos y está en conformidad con la sección 32101 de la Ley FAST ( la “Ley de Transporte de Superficie de Estado Unidos”), que se convirtió en ley en los Estados Unidos el 14 de Diciembre de 2015. Deuda de impuestos delincuente significa une deuda tributaria federal impaga y legalmente exigible de un individuo que totaliza más de $50,000 que se ha evaluado y por la cual se ha presentado una Notificación de Gravamen Fiscal Federal y todos los recursos administrativos conforme a la Sección 6320 del  Código de Impuestos Internos han caducado agotado, o donde se haya emitido un impuesto federal. El IRS está obligado por ley a emitir un Aviso de Intención de  Cobrar antes de emitir un impuesto federal. Estos avisos informan a los contribuyentes que podrían ser certificados como contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes; y podrían ser los únicos avisos recibidos que alertan a los contribuyentes de que su pasaporte de los Estados  Unidos está en peligro o se le está negando o revocando.

 

Cualquier contribuyente seriamente delincuente que sea responsable de una deuda tributaria, que incluye impuestos, multas e intereses, en exceso de $50,000 y que no haya firmado un acuerdo de pago en cuotas o realizado otros acuerdos con el IRS para resolver la obligación tributaria, puede tener su pasaporte de los Estados Unidos denegado o revocado. El IRS está autorizado por la Ley de Impuestos de Estados Unidos para certificar ante el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos que la deuda impositiva del contribuyente está seriamente delincuente.

 

Una vez que el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos reciba la certificación de contribuyente seriamente delincuente del IRS, el Departamento de Estado no emitirá ni renovara un pasaporte. El Departamento de Estado puede revocar el pasaporte actual de los contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes que les impida viajar fuera de los Estados Unidos. Si la revocación de produce mientras el contribuyente esta en el extranjero, el contribuyente podría tener dificultades para entrar a los Estados Unidos en el puerto de entrada porque su pasaporte de los Estados Unidos ya no sería válido. Obviamente, los contribuyentes certificados por el IRS como delincuentes graves pueden tener sus vidas al revés con poca o ninguna advertencia previa mas allá de Aviso CP504 del IRS.

 

Los contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes solo tienen un remedio judicial para impugnar la certificación del contribuyente seriamente delincuente del IRS. La sección 7345(e) del Código de Ingresos Internos le permite a un contribuyente agravado iniciar una acción civil contra el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos en el Tribunal Fiscal de los Estados Unidos o en el Tribunal de Distrito de los Estados Unidos correspondiente para impugnar la certificación del contribuyente seriamente delincuente.

 

 

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Civil Action by Taxpayer in Denial or Revocation of United States Passport Cases

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
January 08, 2019

 

Civil Action by Taxpayer in Denial or Revocation of United States Passport Cases

The United States Congress has authorized the denial or revocation of United States passports to taxpayers with seriously delinquent tax debt.  This authorization is codified in Internal Revenue Code Section 7345 and is pursuant to section 32101 of the FAST Act (the “Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act”), which became law in the United States on December 14, 2015.  Seriously delinquent tax debt means an unpaid, legally enforceable federal tax debt of an individual totaling more than $50,000 that has been assessed and for which a Notice of Federal Tax Lien has been filed and all administrative remedies under Internal Revenue Code Section 6320 has lapsed or been exhausted, or where a federal tax levy has been issued.  The IRS is required under law to issue a Notice of Intent to Levy before issuing a federal tax levy.  These notices informs taxpayers that they could be certified as seriously delinquent taxpayers; and they might be the only notices received that alert taxpayers that their U.S. passport is in danger or being denied or revoked.

 

Seriously delinquent taxpayer

Any seriously delinquent taxpayer who is liable for a tax debt, which includes taxes, penalties and interest, in excess of $50,000 and has not entered into an installment agreement or made other arrangements with the IRS to resolve the tax obligation can have their United States Passport denied or revoked.  The IRS is authorized under U.S. Tax Law to certify to the U.S. State Department that the taxpayer’s tax debt is seriously delinquent.

 

The State Department may revoke the seriously delinquent taxpayer’s current passport preventing them from traveling outside of the United States

Once the U.S. State Department receives the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification, the State Department will not issue or renew a passport.  The State Department may revoke the seriously delinquent taxpayer’s current passport preventing them from traveling outside of the United States.  If the revocation occurs while the taxpayer is abroad, the taxpayer could have difficulty reentering the Unites States at the port of entry because their U.S. Passport would no longer be valid.  Obviously taxpayers certified by the IRS as seriously delinquent can have their lives turned up-side-down with little or no advance warning beyond IRS Notice CP504.

 

Seriously Delinquent Taxpayers only have a judicial remedy to challenge the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification

Seriously Delinquent Taxpayers only have a judicial remedy to challenge the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification.  Internal Revenue Code Section 7345(e) allows an aggrieved taxpayer to bring a civil action against the United States Government in the U.S. Tax Court or in the appropriate U.S. District Court to challenge the seriously delinquent taxpayer certification.

 

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Quien puede firmar declaraciones de contribuyentes fallecidos?

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Público Certificado
Diciembre 19, 2018

Quien puede firmar declaraciones de contribuyentes fallecidos?

 

El Código de Regresos Internos Sección 6012(b)(1) dice que “las declaraciones de impuestos de los difuntos deben ser realizadas por el albacea, administrador u otra persona acusada de la propiedad del difunto.”   Una persona que se hace cargo de la propiedad del difunto significa una persona que tiene posesión, custodia, o control legal de la propiedad del difunto. Esta persona normalmente seria un cónyuge, hijo o hija sobreviviente o un ejecutor designado por el tribunal. La persona acusada de la propiedad del difunto también podría ser un fideicomiso del fideicomiso del difunto.

 

La última declaración de impuestos del difunto se debe a los mismos plazos de presentación que se habrían aplicado si el difunto no hubiera fallecido si se hubieran alcanzado los umbrales de ingresos de declaración de impuestos aplicables en el momento de la muerte del difunto

 

La última declaración de impuestos del difunto se debe a los mismos plazos de presentación que se habrían aplicado si el difunto no hubiera fallecido si se hubieran alcanzado los umbrales de ingresos de declaración de impuestos aplicables en el momento de la muerte del difunto. El declarante debe poner el nombre del difunto, el numero de identificación del contribuyente, el hecho de que el difunto falleció y la fecha de fallecimiento en la parte superior de la declaración de impuestos. La declaración debe estar firmada por el albacea, el administrador u otra persona del difunto que este en posesión, custodia o control de los bienes del difunto.

 

El Formulario 1310 tiene que ser presentado ante el IRS cuando se solicita el crédito o reembolso de impuestos de un difunto

 

Si el declarante está tratando de recuperar un crédito o reembolso de impuestos, el IRS puede exigirle que presente una prueba documental de su autoridad legal para presentar la declaración o recibir el reembolso de impuestos. El Formulario 1310 tiene que ser presentado ante el IRS cuando se solicita el crédito o reembolso de impuestos de un difunto.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Who May Sign Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, and Certified Public Accountant
December 11, 2018

Who May Sign Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

 

Internal Revenue Code Section 6012(b)(1) states that  “[t]ax returns of decedents are to be made by the decedent’s executor, administrator, or other person charged with the property of the decedent.”  A person having charge of the decedent’s property means a person who has lawful possession, custody or control of the decedent’s property.   This person would typically be a surviving spouse, son or daughter or a court appointed executor.  The person charged with the property of the decedent could also be a trustee of the decedent’s trust.

 

Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

 

The decedent’s last tax return is due by the same filing deadlines that would have applied if the decedent had not died if the applicable tax return filing income thresholds were met at the time of decedent’s death.  The filer should put the decedent name, taxpayer identification number, the fact that the decedent is deceased, and the date of death of the decedent on the top of the tax return.  The return should be signed by the decedent’s executor, administrator, or other person in possession, custody or control of the decedent’s property.

 

Form 1310 for seeking a decedent’s tax credit or refund

 

If the filer is seeking to recover a tax credit or refund, the IRS may require the filer to submit documentary proof of their legal authority to file the return or receive the tax refund.  Form 1310 should be filed with the IRS when seeking a decedent’s tax credit or refund.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Nueva zona de oportunidad de incentivos fiscales e inversores extranjeros

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Certificado Publico
Diciembre 04, 2018

Los inversores de todo el mundo han realizado inversiones sustanciales en los Estados Unidos. Los inmigrantes han llegado como constructores de infraestructura de los Estados Unidos, como ferrocarriles, vías navegables, carreteras. Los inversionistas extranjeros han contribuido como empresarios seriales en alta tecnología, vacuencias, salud, condición física y bienestar; y los inversionistas extranjeros han creado otros negocios de vanguardia en campos como las nanotecnologías y la inteligencia artificial. Nombre la industria o el espacio económico y encontrara inversionistas extranjeros construyendo y contribuyendo al crecimiento de Estados Unidos específicamente y a la prosperidad global en general. Las clasificaciones de visas favoritas buscadas por los inversionistas extranjeros durante años han sido la Visa Series L o una de las mucha Visa Series E. La categoría de visa de ejecutivo no inmigrante y administrador no transferido dentro de la empresa L-1A esta diseñada para inversionistas extranjeros que desean transferir, de manera temporal, ejecutivos y gerentes de sus oficinas afiliadas extranjeras a una de sus oficinas o plantas dentro de los Estados Unidos con el propósito de administrar su inversión en Estados Unidos; o con el propósito de establecer una nueva filial, oficina, planta o empresa comercial dentro de los  Estados Unidos. En los últimos años, la Clasificación de Visa Serie L-1  ha sido un vehículo favorito de visa de no inmigrante, especialmente cuando la Clasificación de Visa Serie E fue menos atractiva o imposible debido a los requisitos de visa E-2. Por ejemplo, la Visa E-2 requiere que el inversionista no inmigrante sea ciudadano de un país con un Tratado E1 o E2 con los Estados Unidos. Muchos aspirantes a inversionistas provienen de países que no tienen un tratado de inversionistas con los Estados Unidos; por ejemplo, ciudadanos de Vietnam, Brasil y Rusia; para nombrar solo algunos países del mundo que no son países del Tratado. Los ciudadanos de esos países y otros países sin tratados pueden solicitar una visa de no inmigrante de la Serie L si se cumplen todos los requisitos específicos. Además, si los ciudadanos de países que no participan en un tratado pueden invertir más de un millos de dólares, $500,000 en áreas de alto desempleo económico o áreas en dificultades, pueden solicitar la Visa de inmigrante E-5 diseñada para aumentar el desarrollo económico en los Estados Unidos al atraer inversionistas extranjeros dándoles la oportunidad de obtener la residencia permanente en los Estados Unidos para ellos, sus esposas y esposo, y sus hijos menores de 21 años de edad. La Ley de Recortes de Impuestos y Empleos de 2017 puede haber proporcionado otro incentivo para estimular a los extranjeros y otros a invertir en nuevas Zonas de Oportunidad.

 

Zonas de oportunidad fueron creados en La Ley de Recortes de Impuestos y  Empleos de 2017 bajo Código de Rentas Internas 1400Z-1 y 1400Z-2. Una zona de oportunidad es una comunidad designada económicamente en dificultades. El Servicio de Impuestos Internos es la Agencia de los Estados Unidos delegada con la autoridad para designar y administrar el proceso de nominación y designación de la Zona de Oportunidad bajo el IRC 1400Z-1. Bajo un proceso de nominación completado a principios de Junio de 2018, el IRS designo zonas de oportunidad en los 50 estados, el Distrito de Columbia y cinco territorios de los Estados Unidos. Estas zonas de oportunidad designadas mantienen su estado durante diez años y no están sujetas a la re determinación dentro de los estados o dentro de DC o los cinco territorios. Una lista de las zonas de oportunidad puede ser encontrada en IRS Notica 2018-48. Los gobiernos estatales y locales donde se ubican las comunidades designadas de la Zona de Oportunidad no pueden reasignar ni elegir de otro modo otras ubicaciones dentro de su estado o municipalidad para reemplazar las designaciones.

 

Las Zonas de Oportunidad Designadas están diseñadas para estimular el desarrollo económico dentro de estas ciudades y comunidades de los Estados Unidos al otorgar a los inversores créditos impositivos dentro de las Zonas  de Oportunidad. No se requiere que los inversores en Zonas de Oportunidad sean o residan en las zonas donde invierten. La residencia no es un requisito para calificar para el nuevo Crédito Fiscal de la Zona de Oportunidad. Las leyes de estructuración de entidades comerciales del estado podrían requerir la residencia con el estado y otros requisitos específicos del estado para aquellas que forman entidades comerciales u operan dentro de su estado; Los códigos de negocios estatales son diferentes de un estado a otro. Un crédito fiscal, a diferencia de una deducción fiscal, es una reducción dólar por dólar de los ingresos imponibles de un contribuyente. Inversionistas que desean invertir en la Zona de Oportunidad tienen que a tiempo presentar Formulario IRS 8996, Cualidad de Fondo de Oportunidad. Este formulario puede ser presentado por cada elegible asociación, compañía limitada (para propósitos de LLC tiene que ser clasificada como asociación o corporación), o Corporación. Los inversores, ya sean extranjeros o nacionales, deben asegurarse de participar en una estructura comercial o de entidad adecuada para clasificar a la entidad como una entidad comercial de fondos de oportunidad. Los requisitos del Fondo Zona de Oportunidad deben cumplirse al presentar los documentos de organización que establecen la entidad según las leyes de las entidades comerciales del Estado. La mecánica o la implementación del plan de desarrollo económico de incentivo fiscal de la Zona de Oportunidad de la Ley de Recortes y Empleos del Impuesto de 2017 aún están siendo desarrolladas por el Servicio de Impuestos Internos que emitió las normas propuestas y las regulaciones propuestas el 19 de octubre de 2018. Lean nuestro blog para mas desarrollos en la Zona de Oportunidad Programa de Incentivos y otros temas de impuestos e inmigración de interés a Ciudadanos de Estados Unidos, residentes permanentes, e inversores extranjeros.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

New Opportunity Zone Tax Incentive and Foreign Investors

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
November 24, 2018

Investors from around the globe have long made substantial investments in the United States.

 

Investors from around the globe have long made substantial investments in the United States.  Immigrants have come as builders U.S. infrastructure, such as, railroads, waterways, highways.  Foreign investors have contributed as serial entrepreneurs in high technology, in biosciences, in health, in fitness and in wellness;  and  foreign investors have created other cutting edge businesses in such fields such as nanotechnologies and artificial intelligence.  Name the industry or economic space and you will find foreign investors building and contributing to America’s growth specifically and to global prosperity generally.  Favorite visa classifications sought by foreign investors for years have been the L Series Visa or one of the many E Series Visa Classifications.  The L-1A Intracompany Transferee Executive or Manager Nonimmigrant visa category is designed for foreign investors wishing to transfer, on a temporary basis, executives and managers from their foreign affiliated offices to one of its offices or plants within the United States for the purpose of managing its U.S. investment; or for the purpose of setting-up a new affiliate, office, plant or business venture within the United States.  In recent years the L-1 Series Visa Classification has been a favorite nonimmigrant visa vehicle, especially when the E-Series Visa Classification were less attractive or impossible due to E-2 visa requirements.  For example,   the E-2 Visa requires that the nonimmigrant investor be a citizen of a country with an E1 or E2 Treaty with the United States.  Many aspiring investors come from countries that do not have an investor treaty with the United States; for example, citizens of Vietnam, Brazil, and Russia; to name just a few countries of the world who are not Treaty Countries.  Citizens from those countries and other none Treaty Countries might apply for an L-Series Nonimmigrant Visa if all of the specific requirements are satisfied.  Further if citizens from Non-Treaty Countries can invest over one million dollars, $500,000 in economic high unemployment areas or distressed areas, they can apply for the E-5 Immigrant Visa which is designed to increase economic development in the United States by attracting foreign investors giving them an opportunity to obtain permanent residency in the United States for themselves, their wives and husband and their children under 21 years of age.  The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act may have provided another incentive to spur foreigners and others to invest in new Opportunity Zones.

 

Opportunity Zones were created by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act under Internal Revenue Code Section 1400Z-1 and 1400Z-2

 

Opportunity Zones were created by the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act under Internal Revenue Code Section 1400Z-1 and 1400Z-2.  An opportunity Zone is a designated economically distressed community.  The Internal Revenue Service is the U.S. Agency delegated with the authority to designate and administer the Opportunity Zone nomination and designation process under IRC 1400Z-1.  Under a nomination process completed in early June 2018, the IRS designated opportunity zones in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories.  These designated opportunity zones maintain their status for ten years and are not subject to redetermination within the states or within DC or the five territories.    A list of the Opportunity Zones can be found in IRS Notice 2018-48.  State and local governments where designated Opportunity Zone communities are located cannot reassign or otherwise choose other locations within their state or municipalities to replace the designations.

 

IRS Form 8996

 

Designated Opportunity Zones are designed to spur economic development within these American cities and communities by giving investors within the Opportunity Zones tax credits.  Investors in Opportunity Zones are not required to be from or even reside in the zones where they invest.  Residence is not a requirement to qualify for the new Opportunity Zone Tax Credit.  State business entity structuring laws could require residency with the State and other State specific requirements  on those forming business entities or operating within their State; State business codes are different from State to State.   A tax credit, unlike a tax deduction, is a dollar for dollar reduction of a taxpayer’s taxable income.  Investors desiring to invest in an Opportunity Zone must timely file IRS Form 8996, Qualified Opportunity Fund.  This form can be filed by any eligible Partnership, Limited Liability Company (for tax purposes LLC must be classified as a partnership or corporation), or Corporation.  Investors, whether foreign or domestic, must ensure that they engage in proper business or entity structuring to classify the entity as an opportunity fund business entity.  Opportunity Zone Fund requirements must be satisfied when filing organizing documents establishing the entity under State business entity laws.  The mechanics or implementation of the Opportunity Zone tax incentive economic development plan of the 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act are still being developed by the Internal Revenue Service who issued proposed rules and proposed regulations on October 19, 2018.  Watch our blog posts for further developments in the Opportunity Zones Tax Incentive Program and other tax and immigration topics of interest to United States citizens, permanent residents and foreign investors.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Que hay de malo en pagar los gastos del negocio en efectivo?

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, CPA
Octubre 26, 2018

 

De conformidad con la Sección 162 del Código de Rentas Internas, un negocio puede deducir un gasto incurrido en el negocio si es un gasto ordinario y necesario. Un gasto ordinario es habitual en la industria, el comercio o la profesión del contribuyente. Los gastos de negocio deben ser necesarios, útiles o útiles para llevar a cabo el propósito comercial o para llevar a cabo el negocio  del contribuyente. Parte del paquete “ordinario y necesario” es la realidad de que un gasto debe ser razonable. Si un gasto es ordinario, necesario y razonable depende de todos los hechos y circunstancias.

 

 

Los contribuyentes deben probar que los gastos son deducibles en sus declaraciones de impuestos! Para deducir un gasto ordinario, necesario y razonable, un contribuyente debe justificar o probar el gasto. La sustanciación simplemente significa que el contribuyente debe mantener documentación que muestre la fecha, el monto y el propósito comercial de la transacción. El contribuyente también debe verificar la forma y el método de pago de la transacción. Qué hay de malo en pagar los gastos de negocio en efectivo? El efectivo es fungible, lo que significa que, en general, no deja rastro de a dónde va ni de dónde viene. Por lo tanto, si un contribuyente debe realizar transacciones comerciales en efectivo, el contribuyente debe crear y mantener un registro contemporáneo que documente la fecha, el monto, las parte y el propósito comercial de la transacción. Un recibo de efectivo podría ser una forma conveniente de documentar las transacciones en efectivo. Del mismo modo, un diario contemporáneo podría ser una herramienta útil para documentar transacciones en efectivo.

 

 

Las mejores prácticas comerciales son nunca llevar a cabo negocios en efectivo porque las transacciones en efectivo grandes o frecuentes pueden ser indicativas de fraude fiscal u otras relaciones comerciales nefastas. Las transacciones en efectivo no documentadas no pueden ser verificadas, y pueden ser difíciles de seguir. El contribuyente siempre debe, a solicitud del Servicio de Impuestos Internos, producir une justificación creable de todos los gastos comerciales. Los gastos no comprobados no satisfacen los requisitos de la Sección 162 del Código de Ingresos Internos. Recuerde! Los gastos de negocios solamente son deducibles en los regresos de impuestos federales si son ordinarios, necesarios, y razonables. Los pagos en efectivo sin fundamento son una súper mala noticia — enormes facturas de impuestos y posible enjuiciamiento penal por evasión de impuestos federales.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432