Author Archives: Coleman Jackson

Giving is good! Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
June 10, 2019

Giving is good!  Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

The Holy Bible at 1 Timothy 6:17 says that God gives to us richly all things….  It is a blessing to be able to give.  Giving is an expression of gratitude and love.  It is good to give.  Every relationship should be based on the desire to give.  It is more blessed to give than to receive.

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver.  Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 defines “taxable gifts” as the “total amount of gifts made during the calendar year, less deductions provided in subchapter C (section 2522 and following).”  The federal gift tax rules applies to gifts of present interest to a donee as oppose to transfers of future interest by the donor to the donee.  Under United States federal tax laws, the donor (giver) is taxed on the fair market value of the gift.  The recipient of the gift or donee is not taxed on the gift.  But!   Special tax reporting rules imposes on the donee a duty to disclose to the IRS certain large gifts from foreign nationals.

 

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver

 

The total annual valuation of gifts given by a donor is a tally of all gifts given by the donor for the calendar year.  Such gifts are reported annually on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax ReturnForm 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return is due on April 15th of the year following the year of the gift.  For example if Jose Giver gives the following gifts in 2019:

  • Stocks and bonds to Jeremiah Recipient worth $40,000 fair market value;
  • Wires $250,000 to the foreign bank account of Jennifer Recipient ; and
  • Gives $4,000 to his niece, Carolyn Recipient under 21 years of age at the date of the gift.

 

Form 709 United States Gift

Jose Giver must tally the three gifts to all recipients made in 2019 and report the gifts on April 15th 2020 on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return.  The total amount of gifts for 2019 is $294,000. Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 provides an annual exclusion for gifts of present interests made to any person by a donor.  In 2018 the annual exclusion amount is $15,000 and pursuant to IRC Sec. 2523 the annual exclusion is $155,000 on gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens.  For gifts given in 2019 the annual exclusion amount remains $15,000, but the annual exclusion for gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens decreases to $152,000 for gift made in 2019.  Note that the annual exclusion amount is indexed to the inflation rate; therefore, it could change from year to year.

 

Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts

Other federal laws, including other tax reporting and disclosure rules could be implicated by the facts described in the above hypothetical.  For example, Jeremiah Recipient may have to report gains & losses realized on the stocks and bonds.  The $250,000 wired to Jennifer Recipient’s foreign bank account could possibly create reporting requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act which requires that U.S. persons; which includes U.S. citizens, resident aliens, trusts, estates, and domestic entities to file Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts with the Financial Crimes Network on April 15th 2020 if the foreign account balance is $10,000 or more at any time during the calendar year.  Further the $4,000 to his under aged niece implicates the Generation- Skipping Transfer tax rules. That applies when gifts skip a generation.   Giving is good!  Giving is subject to federal taxation.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

 

 

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
May 06, 2019

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets is Department of Treasury (internal Revenue Service’s Form 8938. Form 8938 is filed with the taxpayers’ annual tax return.   Internal Revenue Code Sec. 6038D mandates that specified individuals, who include U.S. citizens, resident aliens, and certain non-resident aliens that have an interest in specified foreign financial assets and meet the reporting threshold must annually report those specified foreign assets using Form 8938.  The federal tax law that mandates these reporting requirements was enacted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010.  The law is entitled the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  The law’s stated purpose is to combat tax evasion by U.S. taxpayers using foreign bank accounts and assets.  This law is separate and distinct from the better known Bank Secrecy act enforced by the Financial Crimes Network (FinCen) mandating foreign accounts disclosures under the FBAR requirements.  We have discussed the FBAR requirements in prior blogs on a number of occasions.  We will not repeat those discussions here.   Interested readers should look up our prior blogs for discussions regarding the FBAR and the penalties associated with violation of the FBAR reporting requirements.  You can read all of our blogs at http://www.cjacksonlaw.com/blog/.

 

Form 8938

 

For now, let’s return to our discussion of FATCA and Form 8938.  Specified individuals with foreign assets meeting a certain reporting threshold must report their foreign financial assets to the Internal Revenue Service annually using Form 8938.   The term, “Foreign Financial Assets” under FATCA is defined broader than mere foreign deposit and custodian accounts; FATCA applies also to “Other Foreign Assets”, which could be any property, including virtual property interest of   Specified Individuals.  For example, the term other foreign asset could apply to foreign land, foreign buildings & equipment, foreign business interest, such as ownership interest in a foreign partnership, corporation, trust, or estate if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  Further, other foreign assets also could apply to Specified Individuals’ interest in foreign stocks, bonds, debentures, virtual currency and, practically speaking, wealth or value formulated in any other form and composition if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  The point is this; the definition of the term ‘asset’ is interpreted broadly under FATCA.

annually reporting of FATCA and Form 8938

 

To summarize, specified individuals must annually report their interest in specified foreign financial assets using Form 8938 if the values of the assets are $50,000 on the last day of the tax year or $75,000 at anytime during the tax year (higher reporting threshold amounts apply to married individuals filing jointly and individuals living abroad).  Fair market value in U.S. dollars is used to compute the asset value pursuant to the IRS instructions for Form 8938.  Normal civil and criminal penalties under the Internal Revenue Code could apply when Specified Individuals who meet the FATCA reporting threshold fail to comply with FATCA requirements.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

Un Cónyuge Puede Ser Liberado De Responsabilidad De Impuesto Federales Bajo Ciertas Circunstancias

Abril 18, 2019
Por Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Público Certificado

 

Un Cónyuge Puede Ser Liberado De Responsabilidad De Impuesto Federales Bajo Ciertas Circunstancias

 

Texas es un estado de propiedad comunitaria, lo que significa que los ingresos obtenidos por cualquiera de los cónyuges durante su matrimonio son un elemento de los ingresos de la comunidad. Según la ley fiscal federal, cada cónyuge es responsable de los impuestos federales sobre ingreso de la comunidad, independientemente de qué cónyuge haya obtenido el elemento de ingresos de la comunidad.

Bajo la Sección 66 (b) del Código de Ingresos Internos, el Servicio de Ingresos Internos puede modificar el resultado de impuestos  federal resultante de la aplicación de las leyes de propiedad de la comunidad y cobrar solo a un cónyuge con respecto a un elemento de ingresos de la comunidad si ese cónyuge actuó como si tuviera el derecho exclusivo a la partida de ingresos; es decir, lo utilizaron en sí mismos y no para el beneficio de la comunidad o el hogar, y no notificaron a su cónyuge sobre el elemento de ingreso de la comunidad antes de la fecha de vencimiento para presentar la declaración de impuestos federal para  el período fiscal aplicable.

 

 

También hay, a veces el alivio equitativo disponible para los cónyuges inocentes, incluso cuando la pareja presentó una declaración de impuestos conjunta que creó la responsabilidad conjunta y separable de ambos cónyuges por el monto total de la deficiencia de impuestos, multas e intereses adeudados en la declaración conjunta.

Este blog de derecho  está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

A Spouse May Be Relieved of Federal Tax Liability under Certain Circumstances

April 08, 2019
By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant

 

Innocent Spouse Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

Texas is a community property state, which means that income earned by either spouse during their marriage is an item of community income.  Under federal tax law, each spouse is liable for federal taxes on community income regardless of which spouse earned the item of community income.

Under Internal Revenue Code Section 66(b), the Internal Revenue Service can modify the federal tax  outcome resultant from application of community property laws and charge only one spouse with respect to an item of community income if that spouse acted as if they were solely entitled to the  item of income; that is, they used it on themselves and not the community or household benefit,  and they did not notify their spouse of the item of community income before the due date for filing the spouse’s federal tax return for the applicable tax period.

 

Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

 

This is only one of the many situations where an innocent spouse might be relieved of federal tax liability.  There is also, sometimes equitable relief available for innocent spouses even when the couple filed a joint tax return which created joint and severable liability for both spouses for the entire amount of the tax deficiency, penalties and interest due on the joint return.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

Beneficios de Impuestos Federales de Vejez, Sobrevivientes, y Seguros De Invalidez

Por Coleman Jackson, Abogado y CPA
Abril 01, 2019

Beneficios de Impuestos Federales de Vejez, Sobrevivientes, y Seguros De Invalidez
La Sección 3101 del Código de Impuestos Internos impone a los ingresos de cada individuo un impuesto federal equivalente al 6.2 por ciento de los salarios recibidos por el individuo con respecto al empleo. El Código también impone un impuesto hospitalario del 1.45 por ciento a cada persona que recibe salarios sin importar si los salarios se ganan dentro de los Estados Unidos o fuera de los Estados Unidos. Con la excepción de las corporaciones, fideicomisos y patrimonios, el Código impone un impuesto adicional del .9 por ciento sobre los salarios recibidos por los individuos. Estas evaluaciones de impuestos constituyen impuestos de empleo o nómina de sueldos.

 

 

Los Acuerdos Internacionales del Seguro Social entre los Estados Unidos y ciertos países extranjeros podrían eximir o aliviar a ciertos ciudadanos contribuyentes de países extranjeros con acuerdos en virtud del artículo 233 del Acto de la  Administración de  Seguro Social. Estos acuerdos Internacionales del Seguro Social se conocen como “acuerdos de totalización”. Están diseñados para brindar alivio a los trabajadores que trabajan en el extranjero durante parte de sus carreras y pagan impuestos relacionados con el seguro social a un gobierno extranjero. Del mismo modo, los acuerdos de totalización están diseñados para otorgar una desgravación fiscal a los trabajadores extranjeros temporales en los Estados Unidos quienes son requeridos pagar en el Sistema de Seguro Social de los Estados Unidos. El propósito de los acuerdos de totalización es limitar los impuestos de vejez, sobrevivientes y seguros de invalidez al país donde se realizó el trabajo.

 

La intención de estos acuerdos internos del seguro social es clara; pero, sin embargo, a veces surgen disputas fiscales con respecto a la naturaleza o caracterización adecuada de la tributación en el país con el acuerdo de totalización. Estos Acuerdos Internacionales del Seguro Social cubren los impuestos relacionados con el seguro social. Puede ser particularmente fastidioso con respecto a los impuestos promulgados por las partes después de la promulgación del acuerdo de totalización en particular. ¿Esos impuestos promulgados posteriormente son  relacionados con ‘el seguro social’ o no? Las cuestiones legales en estas disputas, que a veces se litigan en los tribunales, son si el impuesto en particular cae dentro del ámbito del acuerdo de totalización o la comprensión de las partes. Los tribunales dan gran deferencia a las opiniones políticas de los Estados Unidos y de los funcionarios gubernamentales extranjeros. El texto del acuerdo de totalización se lee a la luz de las opiniones oficiales de los respectivos funcionarios gubernamentales. Los contribuyentes con disputas de impuestos de vejez, sobrevivientes y seguros de invalidez cubiertos por un acuerdo de totalización deben, si es posible, buscar ayuda de los funcionarios gubernamentales respectivos. El texto real del Acuerdo del Seguro Social Internacional en particular es crítico para resolver disputas legales.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Federal Taxation of Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance Relief

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, CPA
March 15, 2019

Federal Taxation of Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance Relief

 

Internal Revenue Code Section 3101 imposes on the income of every individual a federal tax equal to 6.2 percent of the wages received by the individual with respect to employment.  The Code also imposes a 1.45 percent hospital tax on every individual who receives wages regardless whether the wages are earned inside the United States or outside of the United States.  With the exception of corporations, trusts and estates, the Code imposes an additional .9 percent tax on wages received by individuals.  These tax assessments constitute employment or payroll taxes.

survivors

 

International Social Security Agreements between the United States and certain foreign countries could waive or relieve certain taxpayer citizens of foreign countries with agreements under Section 233 of the Social Security Administration Act.  These International Social Security Agreements are known as ‘totalization agreements’.   They are designed to give relief to workers who work overseas for part of their careers and pay social security related taxes to a foreign government.  Likewise totalization agreements are designed to give tax relief to temporary foreign workers in the United States who are required to pay into the U.S. Social Security System.  Totalization Agreements’ purpose is to limit old age, survivors and disability insurance type taxation to the country where the work was done.

 

disability

The intent of these internal social security agreements are clear; but, nevertheless,  tax disputes sometimes arise with respect to the nature or proper characterization of the taxation in the country with the totalization agreement.  These International Social Security Agreements cover social security related taxes.  It can be particularly vexing with respect to taxes enacted by the parties after enactment of the particular totalization agreement.   Are those later enacted taxes ‘social security ‘related or not?  The legal issues in these disputes, which sometimes are litigated in court, are whether the particular tax falls within the ambit of the totalization agreement or understanding of the parties.   Courts give great deference to the political views of the United States and the foreign government officials.  The totalizaiton agreement text is read in light of the official views of the respective government officials.  Taxpayers with old age, survivors and disability insurance taxation disputes covered under a totalization agreement should, if possible, seek help from respective government officials.  The actual text of the particular International Social Security Agreement is critical in resolving legal disputes.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

Los tribunales federales aclaran el estándar para probar la violación intencional del contribuyente del informe de bancos extranjeros y cuentas financieras (FBAR)

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado y Contador Certificado Publico
Febrero 27, 2019

Los tribunales federales aclaran el estándar para probar la violación intencional del contribuyente del informe de bancos extranjeros y cuentas financieras (FBAR)

 

Ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos, residentes permanentes, y algunas otras personas que están clasificados bajo 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5311 y los reglamentos promulgados deben presentar anualmente a la Red de Delitos Financieros un Informe de Banco Extranjero, Formulario 114. Las personas estadounidenses cubiertas por la ley de divulgación deben presentar el informe cada año para cuentas bancarias en el extranjero que excedan los $10,000 en el año calendario anterior, ya sea una cuenta única o un conjunto de cuentas. Si se alcanza el umbral de $10,000 se activan los requisitos de informes FBAR.

 

 

El monto de la multa de FBAR depende de si la violación del contribuyente fue voluntaria o no. Que es la voluntad en el contexto FBAR? El consenso general desarrollado en los tribunales es que el término “voluntario” “denota aquello que es intencional, sabio o voluntario, a diferencia de lo accidental, y que se emplea para caracterizar una conducta marcada por un descuido sin importar si uno tiene o no el derecho a actuar.” Wehr v. Burroughs Corp., 619 F.2d 276, 281 (3d Cir. 1980). Un contribuyente ha violado voluntariamente el 31 de U.S.C. Sec. 5314 cuando a sabiendas o imprudentemente falla al presentar un FBAR. Una persona comete una violación imprudente del estatuto FBAR al participar en una conducta que viola una norma objetiva: acción que lleva un riesgo injustificadamente alto de daño que es conocido o tan obvio que debería ser conocido. El Tercer Circuito de la Corte de Apelaciones en Bedrosian v. U.S., 2018 (3rd Cir. 2018) que

Esta participación esta en línea con otros tribunales que han mencionado las sanciones civiles de FBAR, ver, por ejemplo, United States v. Williams, 489 F. App’x 655, 658 (4th Cir. 2012) así como nuestros casos anteriores que mencionan las sanciones civiles evaluadas por el IRS en virtud de las leyes fiscales, ver, por ejemplo, e.g., United States v. Carrigan, 31 F. #d 130, 134 (3d Cir. 1994).

En Kimble v. U.S., 2018 (Fed, Cl. 2018), la corte dictamino que el contribuyente descuido de manera imprudente su deber de informar las cuentas en el extranjero porqué no reviso sus declaraciones de impuestos para verificar su exactitud y falsamente represento en su declaración de impuestos que no tenía ninguna cuenta bancaria extranjera. Tenga en cuenta que el Anexo B del Formulario 1040 en la línea 7 (a)pregunta específicamente al contribuyente si tienen o no cuentas bancarias en el extranjero. El formato de la pregunta es “sí o no,” y si se responde “si,” conduce a una serie de consultas adicionales con respecto a las cuentas de bancos extranjeros.

Las penas civiles por una violación FBAR están codificadas en 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5321(a)(5).  La multa máxima por una violación no intencional es de $10,000 por incidente. La multa máxima por una violación intencional del estatuto FBAR es mayor de $100,000 o 50% del saldo en la cuenta extranjera no declarada en el momento de la violación.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432