Category Archives: IRS Problems

Giving is good! Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
June 10, 2019

Giving is good!  Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

The Holy Bible at 1 Timothy 6:17 says that God gives to us richly all things….  It is a blessing to be able to give.  Giving is an expression of gratitude and love.  It is good to give.  Every relationship should be based on the desire to give.  It is more blessed to give than to receive.

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver.  Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 defines “taxable gifts” as the “total amount of gifts made during the calendar year, less deductions provided in subchapter C (section 2522 and following).”  The federal gift tax rules applies to gifts of present interest to a donee as oppose to transfers of future interest by the donor to the donee.  Under United States federal tax laws, the donor (giver) is taxed on the fair market value of the gift.  The recipient of the gift or donee is not taxed on the gift.  But!   Special tax reporting rules imposes on the donee a duty to disclose to the IRS certain large gifts from foreign nationals.

 

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver

 

The total annual valuation of gifts given by a donor is a tally of all gifts given by the donor for the calendar year.  Such gifts are reported annually on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax ReturnForm 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return is due on April 15th of the year following the year of the gift.  For example if Jose Giver gives the following gifts in 2019:

  • Stocks and bonds to Jeremiah Recipient worth $40,000 fair market value;
  • Wires $250,000 to the foreign bank account of Jennifer Recipient ; and
  • Gives $4,000 to his niece, Carolyn Recipient under 21 years of age at the date of the gift.

 

Form 709 United States Gift

Jose Giver must tally the three gifts to all recipients made in 2019 and report the gifts on April 15th 2020 on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return.  The total amount of gifts for 2019 is $294,000. Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 provides an annual exclusion for gifts of present interests made to any person by a donor.  In 2018 the annual exclusion amount is $15,000 and pursuant to IRC Sec. 2523 the annual exclusion is $155,000 on gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens.  For gifts given in 2019 the annual exclusion amount remains $15,000, but the annual exclusion for gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens decreases to $152,000 for gift made in 2019.  Note that the annual exclusion amount is indexed to the inflation rate; therefore, it could change from year to year.

 

Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts

Other federal laws, including other tax reporting and disclosure rules could be implicated by the facts described in the above hypothetical.  For example, Jeremiah Recipient may have to report gains & losses realized on the stocks and bonds.  The $250,000 wired to Jennifer Recipient’s foreign bank account could possibly create reporting requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act which requires that U.S. persons; which includes U.S. citizens, resident aliens, trusts, estates, and domestic entities to file Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts with the Financial Crimes Network on April 15th 2020 if the foreign account balance is $10,000 or more at any time during the calendar year.  Further the $4,000 to his under aged niece implicates the Generation- Skipping Transfer tax rules. That applies when gifts skip a generation.   Giving is good!  Giving is subject to federal taxation.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

 

 

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
May 06, 2019

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets is Department of Treasury (internal Revenue Service’s Form 8938. Form 8938 is filed with the taxpayers’ annual tax return.   Internal Revenue Code Sec. 6038D mandates that specified individuals, who include U.S. citizens, resident aliens, and certain non-resident aliens that have an interest in specified foreign financial assets and meet the reporting threshold must annually report those specified foreign assets using Form 8938.  The federal tax law that mandates these reporting requirements was enacted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010.  The law is entitled the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  The law’s stated purpose is to combat tax evasion by U.S. taxpayers using foreign bank accounts and assets.  This law is separate and distinct from the better known Bank Secrecy act enforced by the Financial Crimes Network (FinCen) mandating foreign accounts disclosures under the FBAR requirements.  We have discussed the FBAR requirements in prior blogs on a number of occasions.  We will not repeat those discussions here.   Interested readers should look up our prior blogs for discussions regarding the FBAR and the penalties associated with violation of the FBAR reporting requirements.  You can read all of our blogs at http://www.cjacksonlaw.com/blog/.

 

Form 8938

 

For now, let’s return to our discussion of FATCA and Form 8938.  Specified individuals with foreign assets meeting a certain reporting threshold must report their foreign financial assets to the Internal Revenue Service annually using Form 8938.   The term, “Foreign Financial Assets” under FATCA is defined broader than mere foreign deposit and custodian accounts; FATCA applies also to “Other Foreign Assets”, which could be any property, including virtual property interest of   Specified Individuals.  For example, the term other foreign asset could apply to foreign land, foreign buildings & equipment, foreign business interest, such as ownership interest in a foreign partnership, corporation, trust, or estate if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  Further, other foreign assets also could apply to Specified Individuals’ interest in foreign stocks, bonds, debentures, virtual currency and, practically speaking, wealth or value formulated in any other form and composition if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  The point is this; the definition of the term ‘asset’ is interpreted broadly under FATCA.

annually reporting of FATCA and Form 8938

 

To summarize, specified individuals must annually report their interest in specified foreign financial assets using Form 8938 if the values of the assets are $50,000 on the last day of the tax year or $75,000 at anytime during the tax year (higher reporting threshold amounts apply to married individuals filing jointly and individuals living abroad).  Fair market value in U.S. dollars is used to compute the asset value pursuant to the IRS instructions for Form 8938.  Normal civil and criminal penalties under the Internal Revenue Code could apply when Specified Individuals who meet the FATCA reporting threshold fail to comply with FATCA requirements.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

A Spouse May Be Relieved of Federal Tax Liability under Certain Circumstances

April 08, 2019
By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant

 

Innocent Spouse Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

Texas is a community property state, which means that income earned by either spouse during their marriage is an item of community income.  Under federal tax law, each spouse is liable for federal taxes on community income regardless of which spouse earned the item of community income.

Under Internal Revenue Code Section 66(b), the Internal Revenue Service can modify the federal tax  outcome resultant from application of community property laws and charge only one spouse with respect to an item of community income if that spouse acted as if they were solely entitled to the  item of income; that is, they used it on themselves and not the community or household benefit,  and they did not notify their spouse of the item of community income before the due date for filing the spouse’s federal tax return for the applicable tax period.

 

Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

 

This is only one of the many situations where an innocent spouse might be relieved of federal tax liability.  There is also, sometimes equitable relief available for innocent spouses even when the couple filed a joint tax return which created joint and severable liability for both spouses for the entire amount of the tax deficiency, penalties and interest due on the joint return.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

Acción civil por parte del contribuyente en negación o revocación de casos de pasaporte de Estados Unidos

Por Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Certificado Publico
01/22/2019

Acción civil por parte del contribuyente en negación o revocación de casos de pasaporte de Estados Unidos

 

El Congreso de los Estados Unidos ha autorizado la negación o revocación de pasaportes Estadounidenses a los contribuyentes con serias deudas de impuestos delincuentes. Esta autorización esta codificada en la Sección 7345 del Código de Ingresos Internos y está en conformidad con la sección 32101 de la Ley FAST ( la “Ley de Transporte de Superficie de Estado Unidos”), que se convirtió en ley en los Estados Unidos el 14 de Diciembre de 2015. Deuda de impuestos delincuente significa une deuda tributaria federal impaga y legalmente exigible de un individuo que totaliza más de $50,000 que se ha evaluado y por la cual se ha presentado una Notificación de Gravamen Fiscal Federal y todos los recursos administrativos conforme a la Sección 6320 del  Código de Impuestos Internos han caducado agotado, o donde se haya emitido un impuesto federal. El IRS está obligado por ley a emitir un Aviso de Intención de  Cobrar antes de emitir un impuesto federal. Estos avisos informan a los contribuyentes que podrían ser certificados como contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes; y podrían ser los únicos avisos recibidos que alertan a los contribuyentes de que su pasaporte de los Estados  Unidos está en peligro o se le está negando o revocando.

 

Cualquier contribuyente seriamente delincuente que sea responsable de una deuda tributaria, que incluye impuestos, multas e intereses, en exceso de $50,000 y que no haya firmado un acuerdo de pago en cuotas o realizado otros acuerdos con el IRS para resolver la obligación tributaria, puede tener su pasaporte de los Estados Unidos denegado o revocado. El IRS está autorizado por la Ley de Impuestos de Estados Unidos para certificar ante el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos que la deuda impositiva del contribuyente está seriamente delincuente.

 

Una vez que el Departamento de Estado de Estados Unidos reciba la certificación de contribuyente seriamente delincuente del IRS, el Departamento de Estado no emitirá ni renovara un pasaporte. El Departamento de Estado puede revocar el pasaporte actual de los contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes que les impida viajar fuera de los Estados Unidos. Si la revocación de produce mientras el contribuyente esta en el extranjero, el contribuyente podría tener dificultades para entrar a los Estados Unidos en el puerto de entrada porque su pasaporte de los Estados Unidos ya no sería válido. Obviamente, los contribuyentes certificados por el IRS como delincuentes graves pueden tener sus vidas al revés con poca o ninguna advertencia previa mas allá de Aviso CP504 del IRS.

 

Los contribuyentes seriamente delincuentes solo tienen un remedio judicial para impugnar la certificación del contribuyente seriamente delincuente del IRS. La sección 7345(e) del Código de Ingresos Internos le permite a un contribuyente agravado iniciar una acción civil contra el Gobierno de los Estados Unidos en el Tribunal Fiscal de los Estados Unidos o en el Tribunal de Distrito de los Estados Unidos correspondiente para impugnar la certificación del contribuyente seriamente delincuente.

 

 

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Civil Action by Taxpayer in Denial or Revocation of United States Passport Cases

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
January 08, 2019

 

Civil Action by Taxpayer in Denial or Revocation of United States Passport Cases

The United States Congress has authorized the denial or revocation of United States passports to taxpayers with seriously delinquent tax debt.  This authorization is codified in Internal Revenue Code Section 7345 and is pursuant to section 32101 of the FAST Act (the “Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act”), which became law in the United States on December 14, 2015.  Seriously delinquent tax debt means an unpaid, legally enforceable federal tax debt of an individual totaling more than $50,000 that has been assessed and for which a Notice of Federal Tax Lien has been filed and all administrative remedies under Internal Revenue Code Section 6320 has lapsed or been exhausted, or where a federal tax levy has been issued.  The IRS is required under law to issue a Notice of Intent to Levy before issuing a federal tax levy.  These notices informs taxpayers that they could be certified as seriously delinquent taxpayers; and they might be the only notices received that alert taxpayers that their U.S. passport is in danger or being denied or revoked.

 

Seriously delinquent taxpayer

Any seriously delinquent taxpayer who is liable for a tax debt, which includes taxes, penalties and interest, in excess of $50,000 and has not entered into an installment agreement or made other arrangements with the IRS to resolve the tax obligation can have their United States Passport denied or revoked.  The IRS is authorized under U.S. Tax Law to certify to the U.S. State Department that the taxpayer’s tax debt is seriously delinquent.

 

The State Department may revoke the seriously delinquent taxpayer’s current passport preventing them from traveling outside of the United States

Once the U.S. State Department receives the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification, the State Department will not issue or renew a passport.  The State Department may revoke the seriously delinquent taxpayer’s current passport preventing them from traveling outside of the United States.  If the revocation occurs while the taxpayer is abroad, the taxpayer could have difficulty reentering the Unites States at the port of entry because their U.S. Passport would no longer be valid.  Obviously taxpayers certified by the IRS as seriously delinquent can have their lives turned up-side-down with little or no advance warning beyond IRS Notice CP504.

 

Seriously Delinquent Taxpayers only have a judicial remedy to challenge the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification

Seriously Delinquent Taxpayers only have a judicial remedy to challenge the IRS seriously delinquent taxpayer certification.  Internal Revenue Code Section 7345(e) allows an aggrieved taxpayer to bring a civil action against the United States Government in the U.S. Tax Court or in the appropriate U.S. District Court to challenge the seriously delinquent taxpayer certification.

 

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Quien puede firmar declaraciones de contribuyentes fallecidos?

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, Contador Público Certificado
Diciembre 19, 2018

Quien puede firmar declaraciones de contribuyentes fallecidos?

 

El Código de Regresos Internos Sección 6012(b)(1) dice que “las declaraciones de impuestos de los difuntos deben ser realizadas por el albacea, administrador u otra persona acusada de la propiedad del difunto.”   Una persona que se hace cargo de la propiedad del difunto significa una persona que tiene posesión, custodia, o control legal de la propiedad del difunto. Esta persona normalmente seria un cónyuge, hijo o hija sobreviviente o un ejecutor designado por el tribunal. La persona acusada de la propiedad del difunto también podría ser un fideicomiso del fideicomiso del difunto.

 

La última declaración de impuestos del difunto se debe a los mismos plazos de presentación que se habrían aplicado si el difunto no hubiera fallecido si se hubieran alcanzado los umbrales de ingresos de declaración de impuestos aplicables en el momento de la muerte del difunto

 

La última declaración de impuestos del difunto se debe a los mismos plazos de presentación que se habrían aplicado si el difunto no hubiera fallecido si se hubieran alcanzado los umbrales de ingresos de declaración de impuestos aplicables en el momento de la muerte del difunto. El declarante debe poner el nombre del difunto, el numero de identificación del contribuyente, el hecho de que el difunto falleció y la fecha de fallecimiento en la parte superior de la declaración de impuestos. La declaración debe estar firmada por el albacea, el administrador u otra persona del difunto que este en posesión, custodia o control de los bienes del difunto.

 

El Formulario 1310 tiene que ser presentado ante el IRS cuando se solicita el crédito o reembolso de impuestos de un difunto

 

Si el declarante está tratando de recuperar un crédito o reembolso de impuestos, el IRS puede exigirle que presente una prueba documental de su autoridad legal para presentar la declaración o recibir el reembolso de impuestos. El Formulario 1310 tiene que ser presentado ante el IRS cuando se solicita el crédito o reembolso de impuestos de un difunto.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Who May Sign Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, and Certified Public Accountant
December 11, 2018

Who May Sign Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

 

Internal Revenue Code Section 6012(b)(1) states that  “[t]ax returns of decedents are to be made by the decedent’s executor, administrator, or other person charged with the property of the decedent.”  A person having charge of the decedent’s property means a person who has lawful possession, custody or control of the decedent’s property.   This person would typically be a surviving spouse, son or daughter or a court appointed executor.  The person charged with the property of the decedent could also be a trustee of the decedent’s trust.

 

Returns for Deceased Taxpayers

 

The decedent’s last tax return is due by the same filing deadlines that would have applied if the decedent had not died if the applicable tax return filing income thresholds were met at the time of decedent’s death.  The filer should put the decedent name, taxpayer identification number, the fact that the decedent is deceased, and the date of death of the decedent on the top of the tax return.  The return should be signed by the decedent’s executor, administrator, or other person in possession, custody or control of the decedent’s property.

 

Form 1310 for seeking a decedent’s tax credit or refund

 

If the filer is seeking to recover a tax credit or refund, the IRS may require the filer to submit documentary proof of their legal authority to file the return or receive the tax refund.  Form 1310 should be filed with the IRS when seeking a decedent’s tax credit or refund.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Que hay de malo en pagar los gastos del negocio en efectivo?

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, CPA
Octubre 26, 2018

 

De conformidad con la Sección 162 del Código de Rentas Internas, un negocio puede deducir un gasto incurrido en el negocio si es un gasto ordinario y necesario. Un gasto ordinario es habitual en la industria, el comercio o la profesión del contribuyente. Los gastos de negocio deben ser necesarios, útiles o útiles para llevar a cabo el propósito comercial o para llevar a cabo el negocio  del contribuyente. Parte del paquete “ordinario y necesario” es la realidad de que un gasto debe ser razonable. Si un gasto es ordinario, necesario y razonable depende de todos los hechos y circunstancias.

 

 

Los contribuyentes deben probar que los gastos son deducibles en sus declaraciones de impuestos! Para deducir un gasto ordinario, necesario y razonable, un contribuyente debe justificar o probar el gasto. La sustanciación simplemente significa que el contribuyente debe mantener documentación que muestre la fecha, el monto y el propósito comercial de la transacción. El contribuyente también debe verificar la forma y el método de pago de la transacción. Qué hay de malo en pagar los gastos de negocio en efectivo? El efectivo es fungible, lo que significa que, en general, no deja rastro de a dónde va ni de dónde viene. Por lo tanto, si un contribuyente debe realizar transacciones comerciales en efectivo, el contribuyente debe crear y mantener un registro contemporáneo que documente la fecha, el monto, las parte y el propósito comercial de la transacción. Un recibo de efectivo podría ser una forma conveniente de documentar las transacciones en efectivo. Del mismo modo, un diario contemporáneo podría ser una herramienta útil para documentar transacciones en efectivo.

 

 

Las mejores prácticas comerciales son nunca llevar a cabo negocios en efectivo porque las transacciones en efectivo grandes o frecuentes pueden ser indicativas de fraude fiscal u otras relaciones comerciales nefastas. Las transacciones en efectivo no documentadas no pueden ser verificadas, y pueden ser difíciles de seguir. El contribuyente siempre debe, a solicitud del Servicio de Impuestos Internos, producir une justificación creable de todos los gastos comerciales. Los gastos no comprobados no satisfacen los requisitos de la Sección 162 del Código de Ingresos Internos. Recuerde! Los gastos de negocios solamente son deducibles en los regresos de impuestos federales si son ordinarios, necesarios, y razonables. Los pagos en efectivo sin fundamento son una súper mala noticia — enormes facturas de impuestos y posible enjuiciamiento penal por evasión de impuestos federales.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432