Category Archives: Offshore Assets and Accounts Disclosure

FBAR

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
July 16, 2019

FBAR - foreign bank accounts

 

The 1970 Currency and Foreign Transactions Reporting Act, which is otherwise known as the Bank Secrecy Act requires U.S. residents, citizens and businesses with foreign bank accounts and certain other overseas assets to report those interest to the Financial Crimes Network annually on Form 114 by April 15th of the following year. Form 114 is the Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts or (FBAR). The Bank Secrecy Act has a number of reporting requirements that are placed on financial institutions as well as those placed persons with foreign asset interests.  The record keeping and reporting requirements placed on  foreign account holders  are set out in detail in 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5414Form 114, the FBAR must be filed electronically through the Bank Secrecy Act E-Filing Network website.  The Financial Crimes Network is an agency of the United States Treasury but it is not the Internal Revenue Service.  These are two separate agencies under the U.S. Department of Treasury.

 

The Bank Secrecy Act at 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5414 also requires taxpayers with foreign bank accounts to disclose those accounts on their annual federal tax returns.

 

The Bank Secrecy Act at 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5414 also requires taxpayers with foreign bank accounts to disclose those accounts on their annual federal tax returns.  IRS Form 1040 at line 7a of Schedule B specifically asks whether the taxpayer has an interest or signatory authority over a foreign bank account.  A ‘yes ‘answer to this question on Schedule B requires the taxpayer to identify the country of the account and certain other details.  A taxpayer’s failure to check the box ‘yes’ when they have foreign bank interest or signatory authority over a foreign asset seriously increases their legal jeopardy because courts have said that failure to ‘check the box’  constitutes a willful violation of the  Bank Secrecy Act.  Failure to read the return has been held to be insufficient to avoid liability under the Act.  Avoiding knowledge of the Acts requirements has not been a successful plan.   Federal courts all over the country have addressed these various defenses and found them lacking weight.

 

IRS Form 1040 at line 7a of Schedule B specifically asks whether the taxpayer has an interest or signatory authority over a foreign bank account.

 

When a violation of the Bank Secrecy Act is not willful, the FBAR penalty for failure to disclose financial interest in foreign bank accounts, securities or other financial assets is capped at $10,000.  This cap only applies to non-willful violations of the FBAR statute.  Failure to check the box correctly and failure to disclose to a tax return preparer the existence of foreign bank accounts or other assets overseas is extremely likely to be found to be a willful violation of the Act.  The penalty permitted under the Bank Secrecy Act for a willful violation is equal to the greater of $100,000 or 50% of the highest balance in the account at the time of the violation.  There are also criminal penalties for violation of the Bank Secrecy Act if a taxpayer is tried and convicted under the Act.  Under the law, the Internal Revenue Service has 6 years from the date of the violation to assess the FBAR penalty and they can sue the taxpayer or the taxpayer’s estate to the collect the penalties.  Note that assessed FBAR penalties do not go away with the death of the taxpayer.

 

If the IRS assess FBAR penalties and the taxpayer refuses to pay them, the U.S. government can seek to collect the penalties in federal court pursuant to 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5321(b)(1).

 

Again, If the IRS assess FBAR penalties and the taxpayer refuses to pay them, the U.S. government can seek to collect the penalties in federal court pursuant to 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5321(b)(1).   The government must demonstrate in court by a preponderance of the evidence that (a) the taxpayer is a U.S. resident, citizen or business entity subject to the Bank Secrecy Act, (b) the taxpayer had a reporting obligation under the Bank Secrecy Act and failed to satisfy that reporting obligation, and (c) the nature of the taxpayer’s violation in terms of non-willful or willful violation of the statute, and (d) the taxpayer has failed to timely pay the assessed penalty.  The taxpayer must plead and prove any statute of limitations defects in the government’s case.  FBAR cases, as a general matter, are fact based cases.  Taxpayers win some and loose some.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Giving is good! Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
June 10, 2019

Giving is good!  Giving is Subject to Federal Taxation

The Holy Bible at 1 Timothy 6:17 says that God gives to us richly all things….  It is a blessing to be able to give.  Giving is an expression of gratitude and love.  It is good to give.  Every relationship should be based on the desire to give.  It is more blessed to give than to receive.

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver.  Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 defines “taxable gifts” as the “total amount of gifts made during the calendar year, less deductions provided in subchapter C (section 2522 and following).”  The federal gift tax rules applies to gifts of present interest to a donee as oppose to transfers of future interest by the donor to the donee.  Under United States federal tax laws, the donor (giver) is taxed on the fair market value of the gift.  The recipient of the gift or donee is not taxed on the gift.  But!   Special tax reporting rules imposes on the donee a duty to disclose to the IRS certain large gifts from foreign nationals.

 

Giving in the United States creates tax obligations on the giver

 

The total annual valuation of gifts given by a donor is a tally of all gifts given by the donor for the calendar year.  Such gifts are reported annually on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax ReturnForm 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return is due on April 15th of the year following the year of the gift.  For example if Jose Giver gives the following gifts in 2019:

  • Stocks and bonds to Jeremiah Recipient worth $40,000 fair market value;
  • Wires $250,000 to the foreign bank account of Jennifer Recipient ; and
  • Gives $4,000 to his niece, Carolyn Recipient under 21 years of age at the date of the gift.

 

Form 709 United States Gift

Jose Giver must tally the three gifts to all recipients made in 2019 and report the gifts on April 15th 2020 on Form 709, United States Gift (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return.  The total amount of gifts for 2019 is $294,000. Internal Revenue Code Section 2503 provides an annual exclusion for gifts of present interests made to any person by a donor.  In 2018 the annual exclusion amount is $15,000 and pursuant to IRC Sec. 2523 the annual exclusion is $155,000 on gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens.  For gifts given in 2019 the annual exclusion amount remains $15,000, but the annual exclusion for gifts to spouses who are not U.S. Citizens decreases to $152,000 for gift made in 2019.  Note that the annual exclusion amount is indexed to the inflation rate; therefore, it could change from year to year.

 

Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts

Other federal laws, including other tax reporting and disclosure rules could be implicated by the facts described in the above hypothetical.  For example, Jeremiah Recipient may have to report gains & losses realized on the stocks and bonds.  The $250,000 wired to Jennifer Recipient’s foreign bank account could possibly create reporting requirements under the Bank Secrecy Act which requires that U.S. persons; which includes U.S. citizens, resident aliens, trusts, estates, and domestic entities to file Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts with the Financial Crimes Network on April 15th 2020 if the foreign account balance is $10,000 or more at any time during the calendar year.  Further the $4,000 to his under aged niece implicates the Generation- Skipping Transfer tax rules. That applies when gifts skip a generation.   Giving is good!  Giving is subject to federal taxation.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

 

 

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
May 06, 2019

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets

 

Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets is Department of Treasury (internal Revenue Service’s Form 8938. Form 8938 is filed with the taxpayers’ annual tax return.   Internal Revenue Code Sec. 6038D mandates that specified individuals, who include U.S. citizens, resident aliens, and certain non-resident aliens that have an interest in specified foreign financial assets and meet the reporting threshold must annually report those specified foreign assets using Form 8938.  The federal tax law that mandates these reporting requirements was enacted by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Obama in 2010.  The law is entitled the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA).  The law’s stated purpose is to combat tax evasion by U.S. taxpayers using foreign bank accounts and assets.  This law is separate and distinct from the better known Bank Secrecy act enforced by the Financial Crimes Network (FinCen) mandating foreign accounts disclosures under the FBAR requirements.  We have discussed the FBAR requirements in prior blogs on a number of occasions.  We will not repeat those discussions here.   Interested readers should look up our prior blogs for discussions regarding the FBAR and the penalties associated with violation of the FBAR reporting requirements.  You can read all of our blogs at http://www.cjacksonlaw.com/blog/.

 

Form 8938

 

For now, let’s return to our discussion of FATCA and Form 8938.  Specified individuals with foreign assets meeting a certain reporting threshold must report their foreign financial assets to the Internal Revenue Service annually using Form 8938.   The term, “Foreign Financial Assets” under FATCA is defined broader than mere foreign deposit and custodian accounts; FATCA applies also to “Other Foreign Assets”, which could be any property, including virtual property interest of   Specified Individuals.  For example, the term other foreign asset could apply to foreign land, foreign buildings & equipment, foreign business interest, such as ownership interest in a foreign partnership, corporation, trust, or estate if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  Further, other foreign assets also could apply to Specified Individuals’ interest in foreign stocks, bonds, debentures, virtual currency and, practically speaking, wealth or value formulated in any other form and composition if the reporting threshold is met for the tax period.  The point is this; the definition of the term ‘asset’ is interpreted broadly under FATCA.

annually reporting of FATCA and Form 8938

 

To summarize, specified individuals must annually report their interest in specified foreign financial assets using Form 8938 if the values of the assets are $50,000 on the last day of the tax year or $75,000 at anytime during the tax year (higher reporting threshold amounts apply to married individuals filing jointly and individuals living abroad).  Fair market value in U.S. dollars is used to compute the asset value pursuant to the IRS instructions for Form 8938.  Normal civil and criminal penalties under the Internal Revenue Code could apply when Specified Individuals who meet the FATCA reporting threshold fail to comply with FATCA requirements.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

Federal Courts Clarify Standard for Proving Taxpayer’s Willful Violation of Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR)

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
February 13, 2019

Federal Courts Clarify Standard for Proving Taxpayer’s Willful Violation of Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR)

 

United States citizens, lawful permanent residence and certain other persons that are classified under 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5311 and promulgated Regulations must file with the Financial Crimes Network annually a Report of Foreign Bank Account, Form 114.  The U.S. persons covered under the disclosure law must file the report each year for foreign bank accounts exceeding $10,000 in the prior calendar year whether it is a single account or an aggregate of accounts.  If the $10,000 threshold is met, FBAR reporting requirements are triggered.

 

Form 114 FBAR reporting

 

The amount of the FBAR penalty depends upon whether the taxpayer’s violation was willful or non-willful. What is willfulness in the FBAR context?  The general consensus developed in the courts is that the term, ‘willful’ “denotes that which is intentional, or knowing, or voluntary, as distinguished from accidental, and that it is employed to characterize conduct marked by careless disregard whether or not one has the right so to act.”            Wehr v. Burroughs Corp., 619 F.2d 276, 281 (3d Cir. 1980).  A taxpayer has willfully violated 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5314 when they knowingly or recklessly fails to file a FBAR.  A person commits a reckless violation of the FBAR statute by engaging in conduct that violates an objective standard:  action entailing an unjustifiably high risk of harm that is either known or so obvious that it should be known.  The Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Bedrosian v. U.S., 2018 (3rd Cir. 2018) that

 

This holding is in line with other courts that have addressed civil FBAR penalties, see, e.g. United States v. Williams, 489 F. App’x 655, 658 (4th Cir. 2012) as well as our prior cases addressing civil penalties assessed by the IRS under the tax laws, see e.g., United States v. Carrigan, 31 F. #d 130, 134 (3d Cir. 1994). 

 

In Kimble v. U.S., 2018 (Fed, Cl. 2018), the court ruled that the taxpayer recklessly disregarded her duty to report foreign accounts because she failed to review her tax returns for accuracy and falsely represented in her tax return that she did not have any foreign bank accounts.  Note that Schedule B of Form 1040 at line 7(a) specifically asks taxpayer’s whether or not they have any foreign bank accounts. The question format is ‘yes or no’, and if it is answered ‘yes’, it leads to a series of additional inquiries with respect to the foreign bank accounts.

 

The civil penalties for a FBAR violation

 

The civil penalties for a FBAR violation are codified in 31 U.S.C. Sec. 5321(a)(5).  The maximum penalty for a non-willful violation is $10,000 per occurrence.  The maximum penalty for a willful violation of the FBAR statute is the greater of $100,000 or 50% of the balance in the unreported foreign account at the time of the violation.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Offshore Accounts? The Train Is Leaving the Station! IRS To End Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) on September 28, 2018

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
September 22, 2018

The IRS is closing down the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018.  This voluntary international tax compliance program was designed to help people, organizations and business entities hiding money, accounts and assets overseas to get current and come into compliance with U.S. tax laws voluntarily under a reduced civil penalty structure and leniency with respect to potential criminal prosecution.  This program that has been in effect since about 2009  and extended in 2012 and again in 2014 is ending in about 7 days.

Non-compliant taxpayers with offshore accounts and assets have seven days to request permission to enter into the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program.  Entry into the program begins with submission to the IRS Criminal Division a request for preliminary consideration for disclosure under the OVDP program.  If the prelim request is granted, the disclosure, review, approval and closing process takes about 12 to 18 months.  Taxpayers who may have committed criminal international tax evasion or are holding undisclosed offshore accounts risk being reported by their offshore banking or financial institution since these overseas institutions are required to either directly or indirectly report United States Citizens and/or Green Card Holders with accounts in their financial institutions to the Internal Revenue Service.

Once the OVDP expires on September 28, 2018, the IRS might implement a replacement program or some procedure or method for non- compliant taxpayers to come into international tax compliance, but as of yet, the IRS has not announced any offshore accounts leniency programs or procedures that will replace the expiring OVDP.  Word to the wise— apply for the OVDP before it expires on September 28, 2018.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

IRS to End the 2014 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, CPA
March 27, 2018

IRS to End the 2014 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program - OVDP on September 28, 2018

Have you heard the news!  On Monday, March 13, 2018 the IRS announced that it will end the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018.

It is likely already too late for all those people who are taking their chances and have not already made steps to enter the OVDP.  Practitioners from all over the country have experienced extreme delays in getting taxpayers pre-cleared into the 2014 OVDP for months.  Pre-clearance requests are taking more than 6 months these days.  IRS representatives have stated that the preclearance processing unit of the IRS has long backlogs in even logging in new OVDP preclearance requests.  The unit has about a 9 to 12 month back log in pre-clearance requests… so we have been told.

Taxpayers who have not taken advantage of the 2014 OVDP must act quickly.

Taxpayers who have not taken advantage of the 2014 OVDP must act quickly.  Repeat it is possible that it is now too late to act.  The U.S. Treasury has been receiving directly or indirectly information from foreign financial institutions concerning U.S. persons with foreign bank accounts for about two years now.   They probably already know those U.S. persons who hold foreign bank accounts.  The chances of being detected with respect to foreign bank holdings are probably extremely high.  In fact it might be impossible to hide from detection; and, possible federal prosecution of violators could rise.

Violators of FBAR rules by failing to timely report offshore bank accounts are subject to civil fines and criminal prosecution.  Foreign Bank Accounts are reported annually on April 15th by filing Form 114 with the Financial Crimes Network.  Delinquent FBARs put taxpayers in legal jeopardy.  There may also be federal income tax issues involved also if the taxpayer has under-reported its income or unfiled federal tax returns.   Tax fraud and delinquent FBARs are serious crimes which can result in violators spending years in federal prison upon conviction.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

U.S. Persons Holding Controlling Interests in Foreign Businesses – The Long Arm of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, CPA
December 05, 2017

U.S. Persons Holding Controlling Interests in Foreign Businesses

Pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 6038, U.S. persons (this term includes citizens and green card holders of the United States under U.S. Tax Law) holding controlling interest in foreign corporations must annually disclose certain ownership and financial information about the business and the U.S. taxpayer’s interest in the foreign business.  This reporting requirement is not a substitute to filing requirements managed by the Financial Crimes Network that we have discussed in detail in previous blogs dealing with U.S. persons (whether U.S. citizen or Permanent Resident) holding ownership interest or signatory power of foreign bank account(s) with an account balance of $10,000 or more at anytime during a calendar year must file FINCEN Form 114 on April 15th of each year.  The focus of this particular blog deals with IRC Sec. 6038 which requires information reporting with respect to certain foreign corporations and partnerships when U.S. Persons hold a controlling interest in those foreign businesses.

What information must be disclosed?   In the case of an individual or domestic business entity, the statute requires disclosure of the foreign entity information in the tax reporting year of the U.S. person. The following type of information with respect to any foreign business entity must be filed with the Internal Revenue Service:

  1. The name, address, and employer identification number , if any, of the corporation;
  2. The principal place of business of the corporation;
  3. The date of incorporation and the country under whose laws incorporated;
  4. The name and address of the foreign corporation’s statutory or resident agent in the country of incorporation;
  5. The name, address, and identifying number of any branch office or agent of the foreign corporation located in the United States;
  6. The name and address of the person (or persons) having custody of the books of account and records of the foreign corporation, and the location of such books and records if different from such address;
  7. The nature of the corporation’s business and the principal places where conducted;
  8. As regards the outstanding stock of the corporation-
    1. A description of each class of stock, and
    2. The number of shares of each class outstanding at the beginning and end of the annual accounting period;
  9. A list showing the name, address, and identifying number of, and number of shares of each class of the corporation’s stock held by each United States person who owns five percent or more in value of any class of the corporation’s outstanding shares;
  10. Statement of the corporations earnings, profits and loss, distributions and so forth;
  11. A summary statement of transactions with related parties during the accounting period;
  12. Accrued payments and receipts financial statements, such as, balance sheet and so forth.

The Long Arm of the U.S. Internal Revenue Service

The current Internal Revenue Code was last updated in 1986; before that revision; it was the original IRC written back in the 1950’s.  The Internal Revenue Code speaks in terms of corporations; but the Internal Revenue Code was written before the inception of certain business structures such as the adoption and passage by many states of limited liability company’s statutes.  The LLC business entity type is not in the current Internal Revenue Code; so other tax sections or chapters of the code are applied to these entities even though the code does not expressly mention LLCs.  IRC Sec. 6038’s provisions apply to partnerships, Limited Liability Companies and other entities structured under domestic laws of any State or structured under any foreign country’s laws.  Code Sec. 6038 applies to entities that are not officially structured as ‘corporations’.  It applies to U.S. persons holding controlling interests in foreign businesses.  The disclosure made by U.S. Persons holding controlling interests in foreign businesses are made either on Form 5471 or Form 2952 for tax periods occurring after December 31, 1982.

A U.S. person is deemed to be in control of a foreign corporation if at any time during that person’s taxable year it owns stock possessing more than 50 percent of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote, or more than 50 percent of the total value of shares of all classes of stock of the foreign corporation.  U.S. persons holding controlling interest in another entity whether domestic or foreign that holds controlling interest in another foreign corporation also meets the required disclosure requirements under IRC Sec. 6038.  In the case of a business entity who owns a controlling interest in a foreign business, the statute requires disclosure of the foreign entity information in the tax reporting year of the U.S. domestic corporation, partnership or other domestic entity’s tax reporting year (could be calendar year basis or fiscal year depending upon the tax elections the domestic entity has made with respect its federal taxes).  The exact same information listed above must be filed with the Internal Revenue Service on IRS Form 2952, in duplicate for each separate foreign business interest of the domestic entity.  Treasury Regulations 1.6038-2 provides an example of the application of these tax rules as follows:

Example:  Corporation A owns 51 percent of the voting stock in Corporation B.  Corporation B owns 51 percent of the voting stock in Corporation C.  Corporation C in turn owns 51 percent of the voting stock in Corporation D.  Corporation D is controlled by Corporation A.

This example only touches the surface of the complexity of this tax topic.  The statutes’ disclosure rules also apply to partnership interest, joint ventures and other types of business entities where controlling interest is held by U.S. Persons in foreign businesses.

Special rules apply to certain nonresident aliens.  An individual who makes an IRC Sec. 6013(g) or 5013(h) election will be considered a United States person for purposes of IRC Sec. 6038 subject to various exceptions.

Joint ventures and other types of business entities where controlling interest is held by U.S. Persons in foreign businesses

If any U.S. person, who is subject to the IRC Sec. 6038 disclosure requirements, fails to timely file and disclose the required information in compliance with IRC Sec. 6038, that U.S. person must pay a $10,000 penalty for each annual accounting period of each controlling interest in each foreign corporation with respect to which the failure occurs.  Failure to comply with IRC Sec. 6038 after notice from the Internal Revenue Service subjects the U.S. person holding controlling interest in a foreign corporation to a maximum of $50,000 for each failure to disclose.  The IRS could also assess other tax penalties under IRC Sections 7203, 7206 and 7207.

As with most other tax infractions, taxpayers failing to comply with IRC Sec. 6038 can raise lawfully valid reasonable cause defenses in seeking to abate these penalties.  The reasonable cause defense must be written and it must set forth credible reasons why the taxpayer did not timely comply with IRC Sec. 6038.  The reasonable cause defense must be made under the penalties of perjury and the validity of it is determined by the IRS District Director or the director of the service center having jurisdiction over the U.S. person’s tax return.  Ultimately the judiciary, such as, the U.S. Tax Court or other appropriate federal court could be petitioned to make the final determination on the U.S. person’s reasonable cause defense.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432