Tag Archives: irs

Cuentas Offshore? El tren está saliendo de la estación! IRS terminara el programa de divulgación voluntaria en el extranjero (OVDP) en Septiembre 28,2018

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado y Contador Certificado Publico
Septiembre 24, 2018

 

El IRS está cerrando el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore el 28 de  Septiembre de 2018. Este programa voluntario de cumplimiento tributario internacional fue diseñado para ayudar a personas, organizaciones y entidades comerciales a ocultar dinero, cuentas y activos en el extranjero para estar al día y cumplir con las leyes tributarias de Estados Unidos voluntariamente bajo una estructura de penalización civil reducida e indulgencia con respecto a un posible enjuiciamiento penal. Este programa que ha estado en vigencia desde aproximadamente 2009 y se extendió en 2012 y nuevamente en 2014 terminara en aproximadamente 7 días.

Los contribuyentes que no cumplen con cuentas y activos extraterritoriales tienen siete días para solicitar permiso para participar en el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore. La entrada al programa comienza con la presentación a la División Criminal del IRS de una solicitud de consideración preliminar para la divulgación en el marco del programa OVDP. Si se concede la solicitud preliminar, el proceso de divulgación, revisión, aprobación y cierre demora entre 12 y 18 meses. Los contribuyentes que pueden haber cometido evasión fiscal internacional o tienen cuentas offshore en el extranjero corren el riesgo de ser informados por su banco o institución financiera offshore ya que estas instituciones extranjeras deben informar directa o indirectamente a los ciudadanos de los Estados Unidos y/o residentes permanentes con cuentas en sus instituciones financieras al Servicio de Impuestos Internos.

Una vez que expire el OVPD el 28 de Septiembre de 2018, el IRS podría implementar un programa de reemplazo o algún procedimiento o método para que los contribuyentes que no cumplan con los impuestos internacionales, pero hasta el momento, el IRS no ha anunciado ningún programa de indulgencia o procedimientos que reemplacen el OVDP que expira. Palabra sabia — solicite el OVDP antes de que expire el 28 de Septiembre de 2018.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

Offshore Accounts? The Train Is Leaving the Station! IRS To End Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program (OVDP) on September 28, 2018

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney and Certified Public Accountant
September 22, 2018

The IRS is closing down the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018.  This voluntary international tax compliance program was designed to help people, organizations and business entities hiding money, accounts and assets overseas to get current and come into compliance with U.S. tax laws voluntarily under a reduced civil penalty structure and leniency with respect to potential criminal prosecution.  This program that has been in effect since about 2009  and extended in 2012 and again in 2014 is ending in about 7 days.

Non-compliant taxpayers with offshore accounts and assets have seven days to request permission to enter into the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program.  Entry into the program begins with submission to the IRS Criminal Division a request for preliminary consideration for disclosure under the OVDP program.  If the prelim request is granted, the disclosure, review, approval and closing process takes about 12 to 18 months.  Taxpayers who may have committed criminal international tax evasion or are holding undisclosed offshore accounts risk being reported by their offshore banking or financial institution since these overseas institutions are required to either directly or indirectly report United States Citizens and/or Green Card Holders with accounts in their financial institutions to the Internal Revenue Service.

Once the OVDP expires on September 28, 2018, the IRS might implement a replacement program or some procedure or method for non- compliant taxpayers to come into international tax compliance, but as of yet, the IRS has not announced any offshore accounts leniency programs or procedures that will replace the expiring OVDP.  Word to the wise— apply for the OVDP before it expires on September 28, 2018.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

REASONABLE CAUSE AND GOOD FAITH – IRS Penalties Can Be Abated, Forgiven or Waived

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
June 21, 2018

IRS Penalties Can Be Abated, Forgiven or Waived

The Internal Revenue Code is full of various kinds of penalties that the Internal Revenue Service is authorized to assess and collect from errant, indifferent, negligent, ambivalent, and indecisive or otherwise noncompliant taxpayers who fail to collect or pay their tax bill or attempt to evade the federal tax laws.  Six IRS penalties that seem to be common in recent years are as follows:

Code Sec. 6672 Penalties:  penalties assessed when taxpayers fail to timely collect, turn over withholding taxes or avoid timely payment of tax obligations;

Code Sec. 6701 Penalties:  penalties assessed against tax return preparers, such as enrolled agents, certified public accountants or others working in the tax return preparation services industry who aids and abet taxpayers in filing false or fraudulent tax returns;

Code Sec. 6676 Penalties:  penalties assessed against taxpayers and others who file tax refund claims or take tax credits without basis in reality, truth or facts.  Unsubstantiated deductions and credits on a tax return commonly give rise to Code Sec. 6676 penalties.   Filing a tax return with the IRS with a false refund request constitutes a false statement under the penalty of perjury.

IRS Penalties

Code Sec. 6697-6699 Penalties:  penalties for failure to file various types of tax returns that should be filed.  Such as failure to file a Form 1040, Form 1120, Form 1120S or Form 1165 can all be the basis for the IRS to assess a failure to file penalty.  Pass through entities, such as, partnerships and s-corporations must still file entity tax returns even though federal taxes are paid at the individual ownership level rather than the entity level.

Code Sec. 6712 Penalties:  penalties assessed against taxpayers who fail to disclose treaty based tax positions.  Immigrants, expatriates and foreigners are especially susceptible to incurring faulty tax treaty position penalties unless they hire well qualified tax consultants in preparation of their annual tax returns.

Code Sec 6662 Penalties:  penalties assessed against taxpayers who fail to report income from foreign sources, such as, foreign bank accounts, foreign businesses, and foreign asset holdings can incur very severe penalties.  U.S. citizens, resident aliens and certain nonresident aliens must report worldwide income from all sources including foreign bank accounts, foreign businesses, foreign trusts and other foreign assets.  Moreover, taxpayers with foreign holdings whose aggregate value exceeds $10,000 at any point during the calendar year must file Form 114, Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) electronically with the Financial Crimes Network (FinCen’s BSA E-Filing System).  Failure to report the existence of offshore holdings is subject to civil and criminal penalties.  It is anticipated that this set of penalties and potential criminal prosecution will be on the rise in the near future because the IRS has announced that it will end the 2014 Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018.

REASONABLE CAUSE AND GOOD FAITH

Another special set of tax rules have long been in force to forgive tax penalties due to reasonable cause and good faith.  The reasonable cause relief is set out in Code Sec. 6664.  The IRS will not impose accuracy related penalties upon a showing by the taxpayer that there was reasonable cause for the tax position and that they acted in good faith with respect to the tax position or act in question.  The reasonable cause defense under Code Sec. 6664 turns on all the facts and circumstances.  That simply means that the IRS and Courts try to determine ‘why’ the taxpayer failed to comply with the federal tax laws.  A taxpayer’s substantial knowledge of federal tax law is a significant factor that the IRS and Courts consider in determining whether a taxpayer acted in good faith and reasonable.  Immigrants or those recently immigrating to the U.S. often lack the sophistication and knowledge of U.S. tax laws.  U.S. tax laws complexity often confounds well educated Americans as well.  Taxpayers reliance on tax return preparers’ suggestions, recommendations and guidance also have been found by many Courts to meet the taxpayers burden to show that they acted reasonable and with good faith.  Taxpayers exercising ordinary business care and diligence sometimes likewise are found by the IRS and Courts as acting in good faith and reasonably.  These various examples simply show that the IRS can abate, forgive or waive federal tax penalties in a very broad spectrum of situations.  Taxpayers confronted with IRS tax penalty situations must act reasonable and be prudent in exploring with their tax attorney the potential that the penalties can be abated, forgiven or waived.  Even fraud penalties can be waived under certain circumstances and criminal charges may likewise be averted.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

IRS REFUNDS LIKE DISCOUNT COUPONS CAN BE LOST

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, CPA
May 11, 2018

IRS REFUNDS LIKE DISCOUNT COUPONS CAN BE LOST

Read discount coupons’ fine print.  IRS refunds like discount coupons can be lost for a variety of reasons.  That is why you need to read the fine print; so that, it is more likely than not, that you receive what you expected.  Read carefully the fine print of the Internal Revenue Code too.

Focus on the Internal Revenue Code.  26 United States Code exclusively set for the guidelines and requirements for federal tax refunds claims.  26 U.S.C. is commonly referred to as the Internal Revenue Code.  The Internal Revenue Code governs tax refund claims.  Taxpayer’s must focus on the fine print or legitimate refunds can be lost.  IRS refunds like discount coupons can be lost.  Under 26 U.S.C.S Section 7422(a), a taxpayer who seeks a refund must make a timely claim for refund.  This means that the taxpayer must file a timely tax return and do everything it can to attempt to collect the erroneously or illegally assessed or collected tax.  This includes seeking an appeals conference within the IRS.  The taxpayer must exhaust these administrative attempts before filing suit against the United States government in the appropriate federal District Court.

A tax refund claim encompasses a taxpayer’s attempt to obtain a credit, offset or return of any overpayments of taxes assessed or collected by the United States government under the Internal Revenue Code

Pay more attention to fine points.  A tax refund claim encompasses a taxpayer’s attempt to obtain a credit, offset or return of any over payments of taxes assessed or collected by the United States government under the Internal Revenue Code.  Refund claims must be filed within the statute of limitations which depends upon whether an original tax return was timely filed.  If a tax return was timely filed, a taxpayer must file a refund claim with the IRS within 3 years of the return due date or within two years of paying the tax.  The due date governs when the statute begins to run.  For example, if the return was due on April 15, 2018 and the taxpayer actually filed early; the actual due date of the return and not the early filing date would govern the start of the statute of limitations.  Likewise, for example, if the payment due date is June 30, 2018 and the taxpayer actually pays on May 15, 2018, the due date of the payment governs the start of the statute of limitations and not when the taxpayer actually paid the tax.   Filing early or paying early reverts back to their respective due dates.  The fallback statute of limitations is two years under the IRC if no return was required; see IRC Sec. 6511(a).  If a tax return was required and no return was filed within three years of its due date; the taxpayer is not entitled to a refund.  Normal filing extensions, insolvency and bankruptcy of the taxpayer and formal agreements with the Internal Revenue Service; such as, installment agreements has absolutely no affect on the ‘due date of the return’ for refund purposes. Pay attention to waivers, however, because taxpayers can waive (give up) their legal rights to recover IRS refunds.

Focus on IRS delays.  The IRS must be given the opportunity to return the erroneously assessed or collected tax, penalty or interest

Focus on IRS delays.  The IRS must be given the opportunity to return the erroneously assessed or collected tax, penalty or interest.  If the IRS refuses to return the erroneously assessed or collected tax within six months of the taxpayer’s refund claim, the IRS is required to inform the taxpayer of its right to an appeals conference pursuant to Treasury Regulation 301.7430-1(e)(3)(iii).  If the government fails to give the taxpayer notice of the right to an appeal conference, the taxpayer can file suit six months after filing its tax refund claim because the presumption is that the taxpayer has exhausted its administrative remedies.  If the IRS gives the taxpayer the required ‘right to appeals conference notice’ but refuses to return the erroneously or illegally assessed or collected tax, penalty or interest after the appeals conference, the taxpayer can sue in federal court.  Note ; however, that no federal lawsuit can be filed against the tax collector, or IRS auditor, or IRS revenue officer because claims for return of erroneously assessed or collected taxes, penalties and interest are claims against the United States government—not claims against the government’s agents, auditors or collectors.  See Kaucky v. Southwest Airlines Co., 109 F. 3d 349 (7th Cir. 1997).  The U.S. government is the only party that the taxpayer can sue in tax refund recovery cases.  The taxpayer must file suit against the United States government for erroneously assessed taxes, penalties or interest within two years after exhaustion of administrative remedies pursuant to 26 U.S.C.S. Sections 7422(a) through 7422(f).    The tax refund lawsuit must be brought in federal court; taxpayer’s cannot sue the federal government in state court for tax refunds.  Tax refund cases can be brought in the Court of Federal Claims and federal District Court with jurisdiction over all parties.  Repeat!  Taxpayers must bring their refund suit within two years of exhausting their administrative remedies.  The federal suit can include claims for recovery of overpaid taxes, penalties and interest.  And when the IRS agents have acted in a manner that is arbitrary and capricious the taxpayer can also seek to recover its administrative cost which includes litigation costs and reasonable attorney fees.  Government agents act arbitrary and capricious whenever their actions have no basis in law or fact.

To summarize; IRS refunds like discount coupons can be lost if the taxpayer ignores the fine print.  Focus on the following summary:

  1. The Internal Revenue Code governs tax refunds relating to taxpayer’s attempts to recover allegedly erroneous assessment or collection of federal taxes, penalties and interest;
  1. Taxpayer’s must file a claim for refund with the Internal Revenue Service within the statutory time frame for filing such claim. The statute of limitation is typically 3 years from the due date of the tax return or 2 years from the payment due date when the tax is paid;
  1. The IRS is required to act lawfully and in a reasonable amount of time pursuant to the Internal Revenue Code and the IRS Practice Manual to resolve administratively tax refund claims;
  1. Taxpayer’s who exhaust their administrative remedy can sue the United States government in federal court to recover overpayments of taxes, penalties and interest from the U.S. government. If the IRS had no basis in law or fact to support its position in denying the taxpayer’s refund claims, the taxpayer can seek to recover administrative cost, including litigation costs and attorney fees pursuant to the 5th Amendment to the United States Constitution.  The pertinent part of the 5th Amendment reads that no one shall be deprived by the federal government of life, liberty or property without due process of law.   The U.S. Constitution sits atop all statutes and other laws both federal laws and state laws; including the Internal Revenue Code.  The term “Rule of Law” simply means that the country is ruled by laws and not the dictates of men.  The federal government cannot constitutionally take anyone’s ‘life, liberty and property’ without due process of law.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

IRS Terminara el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore de 2014 en Septiembre 28,2018

Por: Coleman Jackson, Abogado, CPA
abril 20, 2018

IRS Terminara el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore de 2014 en Septiembre 28,2018

Escuchó la nueva noticia? El Lunes Marzo 13,2018 el IRS anuncio que terminara el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore en Septiembre 28,2018.

Es probable que ya es muy tarde para las personas que tomaron sus oportunidades y no han tomado los pasos para entrar en el Programa de Divulgación Voluntaria Offshore (OVDP, por sus iniciales en ingles). Practicantes por todo el país han encontrado retrasos extremos en lograr que los contribuyentes estén previamente autorizados en el OVDP 2014 por meses . Solicitudes de pre-autorización están tomando más de 6 meses estos días. Los representantes del  IRS han declarado que la unidad de pre-autorización del IRS tiene retrasos en el registro de incluso nuevas solicitudes de pre-autorización de OVDP. La unidad tiene por lo menos 9 a 10 meses de atrasos en solicitudes….por lo que nos dicen.

Contribuyentes que no han tomado ventaja del 2014 OVPD tienen que actuar rápidamente. Repito, es posible que ya sea muy tarde para actuar. El Tesoro de U.S.A. ha recibido información directa o indirecta de instituciones financieras extranjeras con respecto a personas de Estados Unidos con cuentas bancarias extranjeras desde hace aproximadamente dos años.  Ellos probablemente saben que personas de Estados Unidos tienen cuentes de banco extranjeras. La posibilidad de ser detectada con respecto a cuentas extranjeras bancarias es increíblemente alta.  De hecho, podría ser imposible esconderse de la detección; y, el posible enjuiciamiento federal de violaciones podría aumentar.

Los infractores de las reglas de FBAR al no informar puntualmente las cuentas bancarias extranjeras están sujetos a las multas civiles y al enjuiciamiento penal. Cuentas Bancarias Extranjeras son reportadas anualmente en Abril 15, llenando el Formulario 114 con el Financial Crimes Network. FBARs delincuentes ponen al contribuyente en peligro legal. También puede haber problemas con impuestos federales si el contribuyente ha declarado menos ingresos o declaraciones de impuestos federales sin presentar.  Fraudes de impuestos y FBARs delincuentes son crímenes serios que pueden resultar en años en prisión federal sobre convicción.

Este blog de derecho está escrito por  La Firma de Abogados de Impuestos | Litigación  | Inmigración de Coleman Jackson, P.C. con fines educativos; Esto no crea relación de abogado-cliente entre esta firma de abogados y el lector. Usted debe consultar con un asesor legal en su área geográfica con respecto a todas las cuestiones legales que lo afectan a usted, su familia o negocio.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Firma de Abogados de Impuestos, Litigación e Inmigración |Ingles (214) 599-0431 | Español (214) 599-0432

O IRS finalizará o Programa de Divulgação Voluntária no exterior de 2014 em 28 de setembro de 2018

Por:  Coleman Jackson, Advogado, CPA
10 de abril de 2018

O IRS finalizará o Programa de Divulgação Voluntária no exterior de 2014 em 28 de setembro de 2018

Voce ouviu as notícias! Na segunda-feira, 13 de março de 2018, o IRS anunciou que encerrará o Programa de Divulgação Voluntária no exterior em 28 de setembro de 2018.

É provável que já seja tarde demais para todas aquelas pessoas que estão se arriscando e ainda não deram passos para entrar no OVDP. Profissionais de todo o país tem sofrido meses de atraso para conseguir que os contribuintes sejam pré-liberados para o OVDP de 2014. Os pedidos de pré-liberação estão demorando mais de 6 meses nos dias de hoje. Os representantes do IRS afirmaram que a unidade de processamento de pré- liberação do IRS tem longos atrasos na contabilização de pedidos de pré- liberação do OVDP. A unidade tem cerca de 9 a 12 meses de acumulo em pedidos de pré-liberação … assim nos foi dito.

Os contribuintes que não aproveitaram o OVDP de 2014 devem agir rapidamente

Os contribuintes que não aproveitaram o OVDP de 2014 devem agir rapidamente. Repito, é possível que agora seja tarde demais para agir. O U.S. Treasury tem recebido, há cerca de dois anos, direta ou indiretamente, informações de instituições financeiras estrangeiras sobre pessoas nos EUA com contas bancárias no exterior. Eles provavelmente já sabem quais pessoas a possuem. As chances destas pessoas serem detectadas com participações em bancos estrangeiros podem ser extremamente altas. Na verdade, pode ser impossível se esconder da detecção; e, possivelmente aumentar o número de acusações federais aos infratores.

Os infratores das regras da FBAR, ao não relatar a tempo as contas bancárias no exterior, estão sujeitos a processos civis e processos criminais. Contas bancárias estrangeiras são relatadas anualmente em 15 de abril, preenchendo o formulário 114 com a Rede de Crimes Financeiros. FBARs delinquentes colocam os contribuintes em risco legal. Também pode haver questões de imposto de renda federal envolvidas se o contribuinte tiver subestimado sua renda ou declarações de impostos federais não preenchidas. Fraudes fiscais e FBARs delinqüentes são crimes graves que podem resultar em anos de condenação de infratores em presídios federais.

Este blog de advocacia é escrito pelo Tributação | Litígio | Escritorio de Lei de Imigração da Coleman Jackson, P.C. somente para fins educativos; não criando uma relação advogado-cliente entre este escritório de advocacia e seu leitor. Você deve consultar o departamento jurídico em sua área geográfica com relação a quaisquer questões legais que afetem você, sua família ou sua empresa.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Tributação | Litígio | Escritorio de Lei de Imigração | Inglês(214) 599-0431 | Espanhol (214) 599-0432

IRS to End the 2014 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, CPA
March 27, 2018

IRS to End the 2014 Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program - OVDP on September 28, 2018

Have you heard the news!  On Monday, March 13, 2018 the IRS announced that it will end the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program on September 28, 2018.

It is likely already too late for all those people who are taking their chances and have not already made steps to enter the OVDP.  Practitioners from all over the country have experienced extreme delays in getting taxpayers pre-cleared into the 2014 OVDP for months.  Pre-clearance requests are taking more than 6 months these days.  IRS representatives have stated that the preclearance processing unit of the IRS has long backlogs in even logging in new OVDP preclearance requests.  The unit has about a 9 to 12 month back log in pre-clearance requests… so we have been told.

Taxpayers who have not taken advantage of the 2014 OVDP must act quickly.

Taxpayers who have not taken advantage of the 2014 OVDP must act quickly.  Repeat it is possible that it is now too late to act.  The U.S. Treasury has been receiving directly or indirectly information from foreign financial institutions concerning U.S. persons with foreign bank accounts for about two years now.   They probably already know those U.S. persons who hold foreign bank accounts.  The chances of being detected with respect to foreign bank holdings are probably extremely high.  In fact it might be impossible to hide from detection; and, possible federal prosecution of violators could rise.

Violators of FBAR rules by failing to timely report offshore bank accounts are subject to civil fines and criminal prosecution.  Foreign Bank Accounts are reported annually on April 15th by filing Form 114 with the Financial Crimes Network.  Delinquent FBARs put taxpayers in legal jeopardy.  There may also be federal income tax issues involved also if the taxpayer has under-reported its income or unfiled federal tax returns.   Tax fraud and delinquent FBARs are serious crimes which can result in violators spending years in federal prison upon conviction.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432