Tag Archives: Tax

Podcast – Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published January 11, 2021.

Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson, and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses.”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our immigration legal assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses.”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Reyna Munoz, and I am the Immigration Legal Assistant at Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Attorney a lot of folks are receiving bills from the IRS claiming that they owe a “shared responsibility payment for failure to maintain healthcare coverage on members of their household”. I mean some of these bills are for tax periods that are a long time ago, like 2015, 2017 and 2018.  What is this about?
  • Question 1: Just tell me, what is this all about?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 1:

  • Good morning Reyna.
  • Yes Reyna; Congress recently passed and the President recently signed into law a $900 Billion Covid Relief Package with quite a few tax provisions.  The package includes $600 payments to individual taxpayers with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $75,000 or less or in case of head of households with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $112,500.  The new relief payment for joint return tax filers is $1,200 with AGI of $150,000 or less.  And taxpayers receive $600 for each qualifying child.  The new relief package also extended the weekly federal unemployment compensation of $300 for qualified individuals who lost their jobs due to Covid-19.”.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

Question 2:

  • Attorney, who qualifies for the recovery rebate tax credits or stimulus checks?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • Other than the adjusted gross income limitations that I mentioned, the following individuals are eligible to receive stimulus checks unless specifically ineligible:
  • Everyone is eligible other than —
  1. Any nonresident alien individual;
  2. Any individual with respect to whom a deduction under section 151 is allowable to another taxpayer for a taxable year beginning in the calendar year in which the individual’s taxable year begins; and
  3. Any estate or trust.
  • To summarize: Anyone who does not fall into either 1, 2 or 3 above is eligible to receive a stimulus check.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

Question 3:

What is the substantial presence test?

 Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 3:

  • Reyna; that is an excellent question!
  • In United States Tax Law a nonresident alien is any individual who is not a United States Citizen and does not pass the Green Card Test or Substantial Presence Test.
  • To summarize: A Nonresident is anyone who is not
  1. a United States Citizen; or
  2. a Lawful Permanent Resident or Green Card Holder; or
  • a person who passes the substantial presence test with respect to length of physical presence within the United States. We go into detailed discussions of the substantial presence test in prior blogs which can be found on our website and in prior podcast as well.  So I will not go through this mechanical test again now.

 Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney how does an eligible individual apply for a stimulus check?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 4:

  • Well, taxpayers don’t exactly have to apply for stimulus checks.
  • Taxpayers who are eligible to receive a stimulus check will receive the check by direct deposit to any account to which the taxpayer authorized the IRS to send refunds or federal payments to on or after January 1, 2019. In the event the taxpayer does not authorize the IRS to direct deposit the stimulus check the United States Treasury will mail a paper check or debit card directly to the last known address of the taxpayer.  The law requires the Treasury to send out these payments as rapidly as possible.  Eligible individuals should already have received their stimulus check or should receive them pretty soon.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • That sounds easy enough; but Attorney!

Question 5:

  • How will the United States Treasury know the correct amount of money to send to the taxpayer?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • Excellent question!
  • The stimulus payment computations and eligibilities will be based on tax returns filed by taxpayers for the tax period ending December 31, 2019.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 6:

  • What should families do if they think they are eligible but they have not received a stimulus check at all or in the wrong amount?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • They should contact the Internal Revenue Service and inquire.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • Covid-19 has killed a lot of people. And also lots of people have died since December 31, 2019; my question is whether their heirs, such as, surviving spouses and children going to receive their deceased relatives stimulus payments. I am kind of wondering about this since the tax refunds or credits are based on tax returns filed for tax periods ending December 31, 2019.  Is that right!

Question 7:

  • Attorney, are the heirs of a deceased individual eligible to receive a stimulus check on behalf of the decedent?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 7:

  • The “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”. That is the official title of the United States Law that was recently passed by Congress that implemented the tax provisions we have been talking about this morning in this podcast.
  • Under the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”; any individual who was deceased before January 1, 2020 or in case of joint return, both taxpayers were deceased before January 1, 2020; the heirs of those taxpayers would not receive the stimulus payment.
  • Under the Act, any individual who dies after January 1, 2020 or in case of joint return, both taxpayers die after January 1, 2020, the lawful heirs of those taxpayers should be able to claim the stimulus payment. They might have to specifically make a claim with the IRS like you would normally in a decedent representative case. What I am saying is that I am not sure the U.S. Treasury would know to send the stimulus payment to a decedent’s heir or representative unless they are told of the decedent’s death.

Reyna Munoz’s Concluding Remarks

  • Attorney, thank you for this cogent presentation.
  • I know we have not talked about the $900 Billion Covid Relief Packages’ tax implications for businesses yet. Perhaps we can talk more about this and produce a future podcast or blog.
  • Our listeners who want to hear more podcast like this one should subscribe to our Legal Thoughts Podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast. Everybody take care!  And come back in about two weeks, for more taxation, litigation and immigration Legal Thoughts from Coleman Jackson, P.C., which is located right here in Dallas, Texas at 6060 North Central Expressway, Suite 620, Dallas, Texas 75206.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431; Spanish callers:  214-599-0432 and Portuguese callers:  214-272-3100.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431 and Spanish callers:  214-599-0432.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about “Updates on the Recent $900 Billion Covid Relief Package Recently Enacted Into Law. We talked basically about the Stimulus Payments in this blog; but there are many individual and business tax provisions in the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”.  We could do several future podcast and blogs on this massive piece of legislation.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Stay tune!  Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks.  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Podcast – The Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published November 24, 2020.

The Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:
ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson, and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation, and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our law firm’s Immigration Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be giving the answers as she and I will be discussing: “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Hi everyone, I am Reyna. I am the Immigration Legal Assistant at the tax, litigation and immigration law firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Hi Attorney; today we will be discussing the topic: What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?

Question 1:

  • Well, attorney what does the long-arm of the U.S. Tax Code mean anyway?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

  • Good morning Reyna. I think this is a fascinating topic; so let’s get started!
  • United States citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (or commonly known as Green Card Holders) are required to pay taxes on their gross income, regardless of where it is earned or how it is earned in the world.  That basic rule is established in United States Code, Section 61(a); and explained in 26 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1.1-1(b).
  • So, to answer your question, that is why it is often said by tax professionals that the U.S. tax code has long arms.  It can reach U.S. citizens and Green Card holders and their gross income from anywhere in the world.  These are very long-arms indeed!

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 2:

  • That is interesting! How would the United States Government find out about this gross income and these foreign interest of U.S. citizens and Green Card Holders?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • S. citizens and Green Card Holders have a legal duty to voluntarily file appropriate tax returns and other informational materials with the U.S. government reporting their gross income and interests in financial accounts held overseas. Federal tax returns must be filed annually to report gross income (such as, Form 1040 (individuals), Form 1065 (Partnerships), Form 1120 (Corporations), Form 1041 (Estates).  All of these tax forms are filed with the Internal Revenue Service when applicable.  Further U.S. citizens and Green Card Holders with ownership interest or signatory authority of foreign accounts must complete Schedule B, Part III, Line 7 of Form 1040 their individual tax return discussing their interest or signatory authority over any foreign account during the tax period; and moreover, in the event the balance in any single account or combination of foreign accounts is greater than $10,000 during the tax period, the taxpayer must also file an FBAR with the Financial Crimes Network.
  • It will not be hard for the U.S. Department of Treasury to find out about taxpayers reporting obligations today with the technology that is in existence. In fact, it is easier today than ever for information to be shared by business entities, governmental entities and individuals in seconds around the world.
  • The U.S. Treasury has negotiated operating and reporting agreements with governments around the world to share directly or indirectly financial banking information of U.S. citizens and Green Card holders.
  • LET ME JUST SAY, IT IS EXTREMELY UNLIKELY THAT THE U.S. GOVERNMENT WILL NOT LEARN OF THESE EARNINGS AND FOREIGN ASSETS TODAY.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 3:

  • What can happen if a U.S. Citizen fails to report all of their gross income and fail to report their ownership interest in a foreign bank account?
  • First what is a foreign bank account anyway?

Attorney Answers Question 3:

  • A foreign bank account is an account in a foreign institution, or an institution physically located outside of the borders of the U.S. and its territories. Branches of U.S. domiciled banks located overseas are not classified as a foreign bank for FBAR reporting purposes or IRS purposes.
  • Individuals who fail to comply with U.S. laws can expect there to be a gradation of criminal and civil exposure. What I mean by that is in the United States criminal penalties and civil penalties for violation of the law are graded based on level of culpability.  This is also true with regards to failure to voluntarily comply with the U.S tax laws.  The U.S. tax code imposes varies kinds of penalties for violations, such as tax evasion, failure to file penalties, negligent filing penalties.
  • As for failure to report interest in foreign accounts, the IRS is permitted to assess and collect civil penalties against any individual who fails to report their interest in a foreign account on a timely filed FBAR.
  • I have written numerous blogs with regards to the penalty structure designed to hold tax cheats accountable.

 Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney what could you at least explain what you mean by gradation of penalties?

Attorney Answers Question 4:

  • Okay, very well! Let me briefly describe what gradation of penalties means as it relates to failure to file a required FBAR.
  • If an individual’s failure to file an FBAR is deemed willful by the IRS, then the IRS has the discretion to assess a maximum penalty of $100,000 or 50 percent of the balance in the foreign account at the time of the violation. Whichever is higher is the collectable penalty.
  • Willfulness does not require actual knowledge of the duty to report interest in a foreign account. Reckless or careless disregard of their statutory duty to report their ownership or beneficiary interest in the foreign account is enough for the IRS assess and collect the penalty.
  • The IRS has been challenged in Courts around the country, and they have a pretty good betting record on winning the willfulness FBAR cases. Come on, just look; these cases are what lawyers routine call document cases. For example, (1) it’s easy to prove whether someone is a U.S. citizen or Green Card Holder because there is a U.S. birth Certificate or Naturalization  Certificate or Lawful Permanent Resident Card; (2) it’s easy to prove that the account is located outside of the U.S. and its territories because there are bank account statements; and (3) it’s easy to prove that the taxpayer filed a tax return failing to list the foreign bank account because there is Schedule B, Part III, Line 7 of IRS Form 1040.  Hey, three strikes and you are out.  Willfulness to violate the FBAR rules is not a very high burden for the IRS to carry in these FBAR violation cases.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 5:

  • Okay Attorney that sounds like three strikes. It might be hard to hit the ball.  But what about—
  • If the taxpayer hired a professional tax return preparer to prepare and file, the return? Could the taxpayer now say it was none willful?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • Well it depends on all the facts and circumstances as to whether a skillful negotiated and advocate could make out a defense.
  • But the main thing everyone should take away is this:
  • Taxpayers are deemed to have constructive knowledge of and responsibility for the contents of their tax returns which are signed under penalty of perjury.
  • Where immigrants are involved who lacks the knowledge of the English language, cultural norms in terms of voluntary tax reporting, educational challenges and other capacity factors, in these circumstances skillful advocacy might manage to turn what appears to be a willful violation into a none willful violation of U.S. law. People with foreign gross income and foreign account interest need to do their due diligence in picking tax professionals in preparation of U.S. tax returns and compliance with FBAR requires because the penalties for failing to comply are rough regardless of the gradation of the penalties.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 6:

  • Okay, I think I understand.
  • Attorney, you mentioned voluntary disclosure. Is there a way a person can get this right even after they failed to property report their gross income or foreign account?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • Yes, the IRS has voluntary disclosure programs. But the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program or OVDP has ended and the IRS is no longer accepting taxpayers’ disclosures for failing to report foreign accounts under that program.
  • The various Streamlined Procedures Programs are still viable; but only if the violation is non willful. I have written blogs on this in the past and will not go into any more details here; other than, the taxpayer must make sure their actions were none willful because the IRS audits these submissions and if the IRS deems the actions of the taxpayer were willful violations rather than none willful violations, they could make a referral to IRS Criminal Investigations for possible referral to the U.S.  Justice Department.
  • The IRS also still have a FBAR only disclosure program that might be used by some taxpayers under appropriate circumstances.
  • Mayra, thanks for your questions on this topic. We have numerous blogs on foreign accounts on our law firm’s blog site.   We must go for now.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thank you for giving us the opportunity to inform you about What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”
  • We might discuss other aspects of this topic on gross income and foreign accounts matters in follow up podcasts or blogs in the near future.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C., subscribe to our podcast and stay tune!  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate, and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation, and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Podcast – Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax? | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published September 02, 2020.

Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Mayra Torres, the Public Relations Associate of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax?” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:
ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
LEGAL THOUGHTS
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation, and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas
  • Our topic for today is: “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax?”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz,Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our public relations associate, Mayra Torres will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax”

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Mayra Torres and I am the public relations associate at Coleman Jackson, P.C. Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas. We help businesses, individuals and everyone with sales taxes,income taxes, gift and estate taxes and contracts drafting and negotiations and disputes and immigrants on a variety of business and family immigration matters from around the world.
  • Today Attorney we are discussing foreign investments and U.S. Income Tax Law. My first question is basic:

Question 1:

Are foreign corporations ever subject to U.S. income tax laws?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

Mayra, the simple answer is YES, SOMETIMES FOREIGN CORPORATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO U.S.INCOME TAX LAWS!

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

QUESTION 2:

  • Okay then, let me just change my question a little.
  • When are foreign corporations subject to U.S. income tax?

Attorney Answers Question 2:

A foreign corporation is taxed on its taxable income which is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 3:

  • Attorney what do you mean by the term “effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S.”?

Attorney Answers Question 3:

  • That is a very astute question! Think in terms of source of the increment or decrement of wealth of the foreign entity. What I mean is the term effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States means income, gain or loss incurred during a tax year from sources within the United States. The key to understanding the meaning of this term is the source of the income, gain or loss incurred by the foreign corporation. If the source of the income, gain or loss for the year is in the U.S., then the foreign corporation is engaged in a trade or business effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. and are subject to federal income taxation under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.
  • The application of this Code Section does not mean that the income, gain or loss have to come from a trade or business being conducted in the U.S. If the source of the income, gain or loss is in the U.S., Code Section 882 applies and the income, gain or loss is taxable.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 4:

  • Does the foreign corporation have to operate a business within the United States during the tax year in order for these rules to apply to income, gains or losses under Code Section 882?

Attorney Answers Question 4:

  • Yes, that is exactly right. In order for Code Section 882 to apply, the foreign corporation must be engaged in a trade or business within the United States during the particular tax year where the determination is being made whether income, gain or loss is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.
  • The Code Section 882 determination is made at the close of each tax year. If a foreign corporation has income, gain or loss at any time during a tax year from a source within the U.S. and its engaged in a trade or business within the U.S. whether it be in a joint venture or partnership or limited liability company or similar affiliation with a U.S. entity, it is taxable income effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. under IRC 882.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 5:

  • Wow! Attorney that is a lot to digest; can we continue this conversation in another podcast because I have a lot more questions? For example, are there any categories of income, gain or loss considered effectively connected to the United States even if its earned overseas by a foreigner?

Attorney Answers Question 5:

Yes, there are categories of foreign source income that are subject to U.S. income taxation as effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. But you are right Mayra that is enough to ponder for now. We can continue this topic in a later podcast in about two weeks. Please subscribe to our podcast.

Mayra’s Concluding Remarks

  • I am looking forward to continuing this topic in about two weeks!
  • Anyone interested in hearing more about foreign investments and U.S. Taxation should subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast.We also have a lot of blogs going deep into the details of U.S. tax law, litigation and immigration law topics on Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s website at cjacksonlaw.com.

 Coleman Jackson, Attorney’s concluding remarks:

THIS IS THE END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about foreign investments and U.S. taxation. If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C. Stay tune! Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks.We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration. Until next time, take care.

Podcast – Did Your Families ITINs Expire In 2019? | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Published July 14, 2020

Did Your Families ITINs Expire In 2019

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Mayra Torres, the Public Relations Associate of Coleman Jackson, P.C.

The topic of discussion is “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019:  Did your families ITINs expire in 2019.”  You can listen to this podcast here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or where ever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019: Did your families ITINs expire in 2019.”
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our public relations associate, Mayra Torres will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019: Did your families ITINs expire?”

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 1:

What is an ITIN and who uses an ITIN?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

  1. Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers or ITINs are used by people who have federal tax filing or federal tax payment obligations under U.S. federal tax law who are not eligible for a Social Security number.
  2. ITINs are used by many Texans who are not authorized to work in the United States because they do not have work authorizations issued by the Department of Homeland Security; therefore, these workers cannot obtain a Social Security number from the Social Security Administration. I point out that an ITIN cannot be used for work authorization purposes; it is solely to be used for tax compliance purposes.
  3. Many undocumented individuals who live and work in the United States use ITINs which are issued by the United States Treasury for tax purposes. Whole families quite often use ITINs to fulfill their tax obligations and many undocumented children also use ITIN’s so that their parents can take the child tax credit, earned income credit and other benefits offered to taxpayers in the Internal Revenue Code.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question No. 2

  • Oh, I see; thanks for giving me a full answer to my questions.
  • I have a few more questions…: Are ITINs like a Social Security Number; I mean Social Security Numbers issued by the Social Security Administration are assigned to a person for life, right?  How about the ITIN issued by the U.S. Department of Treasury?  Is an ITIN issued to a person for life too?

Attorney Answers Question No. 2

  • Those are extremely good questions, Mayra.
  • A Social Security Number issued to a person by the Social Security Administration is issued to them for life. That means a person receives only one social security number that they use their entire lives.  Most social security numbers are assigned when U.S. citizens are children.  They keep that number for life.
  • No, the ITIN is not issued for the life of the recipient. The U.S. Congress passed a law called “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) which became law on December 18, 2015.
  • The PATH Act modified U.S. Tax law, 26 U.S.C. Section 6109 as it pertains to ITINs in two major ways:
  • Number 1: ITINs that have not been used on a tax return for 3 tax periods expire.  For example, ITINs not used on a tax return in 2014, 2015, or 2016 expired December 31, 2017.  ITINs not used on a tax return for 2015, 2016 or 2017 expired December 31, 2018.  And ITINs not used on a tax return for 2016, 2017, and 2018 expired on December 31, 2019.
  • WARNING: Filing delinquent tax returns are extremely problematic because household ITINs expire by 3 years of none use automatically.  This is a major development regarding ITINs since the PATH Act became law in the United States.
  • Now, let me discuss the second major change to tax law by enactment of the PATH Act:
  • The PATH Act of 2015 authorized the Internal Revenue Service to develop and implement an annual rolling middle digit expiration schedule for all ITINs in circulation.
  • Under this rolling middle digit expiration schedule, the IRS makes an annual announcement listing the middle digits of ITINs which will expire end of that calendar year. This list of expiring ITINs is usually posted on IRS.gov and possibly in financial newspapers.
  • Since publishing the list of expiring ITINs over the years since the PATH Act, the IRS has announced that the following middle digit ITINs would expire if not properly renewed by the holder of the ITIN:
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 70, 71, 72 or 80 expired on December 31, 2017 if not properly renewed.
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 81, or 82 expired on December 31, 2018.
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 83, 84, 85, 86 or 87 expired on December 31, 2019.
  • Let me just say that the IRS announced on October 10, 2019 that these ITINs can be renewed if the holder files a Form W-7 with the proper paperwork. Moreover, the IRS also said that ITINs with middle digits of 70 through 82 that expired in 2016, 2017 and 2018 can also be renewed if the proper paperwork is filed.  So people should understand that they can renew an expired ITIN.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question 3:

Wow that is a lot!  It’s good to know that ITIN users can renew their expiring and expired ITINs.  So how are ITINs renewed?  I mean what does an ITIN user have to do to renew their ITIN?

Attorney Answers Question No. 3 

  • Those are good questions, Mayra.
  • The ITIN holder should have received an IRS Notice CP-48 alerting them to the fact that their ITIN was about to expire. This notice would have given them detailed instructions as to how to renew their ITIN.  This Notice however could have been sent to the address where they lived at the time they originally applied for their ITIN.
  • If they did not receive the notice and instructions, they can still renew their ITIN by filing IRS Form W-7 and complying with all the instructions listed in the W-7 Instructions.
  • I might add that ITIN users should check all of the ITINs used by the members of their household and renew all the ITINs in the household even though only one or two of them have expired. The renewal can be filed for all ITINs in a household; and what I mean about household, is mom, dad and minor children who all use ITINs because they are not eligible for social security numbers.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question No. 4:

  • This has been informative. One last question Attorney:
  • What can happen if an ITIN expires and is not timely renewed?

Attorney Answers Question No. 4:

  • Bad things are all but certain to happen:
  • Tax Refunds could very likely to be delayed
  • The family could be denied the child tax credit with all the potential year-after-year tax difficulties that could arise from falsely claiming the child tax credit
  • The earned income credit could be denied with all the potential long term implications from falsely claiming the earned income credit
  • Accuracy Penalties and interest could be assessed by the IRS for filing inaccurate tax returns.
  • To summarize: A taxpayers failing to renew an ITIN could lead to all kinds of difficulties with the Internal Revenue Service’s Exam Unit and Collections division. Taxpayers who use these ITINs must remain vigilant annually and check to see whether any of the ITINs used in their households are set to expire either because of expiration under the 3 year of none use rule or expiration under the IRS rolling middle digit expiration schedule.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

This is the end of Legal Thoughts for now!

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about expiration of ITINs: It’s time to check Your ITINs because they might be expired or expiring soon.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Subscribe on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcast.  Stay tune!  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers on American Farms During Covid-19 National Emergency

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
May 14, 2020

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

The H-2A nonimmigrant visa classification has been around for a very long time.  See Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) 101(a)(15)(ii)(a), 8 U.S.C. 1101.  The H-2A foreign agricultural workers visa; known as H-2A is more in the public eye right now due to the media’s focus on the rise of Covid-19 cases in meat packing plants, on farms and in rural America potentially resulting in food supply chain disruptions.  The concern of the coronavirus’ disruption of the food supply is very real and it is of grave concern to the well being of farmers’ bringing their goods to market and to their fellow citizens ability to feed their families.  In a nutshell, the foreign agricultural workers program known as the H-2A Visa permits agricultural employers to fill shortages in the available work force by following certain procedures to lawfully bring foreigners to the United States temporarily to perform temporary or seasonal agricultural work.  The Department of Homeland Security defers to the U.S. Department of Labor with respect to defining what work falls into the categories of temporary and seasonal agricultural work.  Historically, the Department of Labor has defined “agricultural labor” as such duties as hauling and delivery on the farm, harvesting, cultivating and planting seed.  Foreign workers on H-2A Visas has historically also worked as sheep herders, goat tenders, cattle raisers, poultry farmers and in other occupations typically in rural areas of America where various kinds of animals are raised for market.  The point is that agricultural workers are not limited to farms performing task around a farm; foreign workers on H-2A Visas work on plantations, ranches, nurseries, meat packing plants, greenhouses, orchards, and as truck drivers and delivery drivers on these or other similar locations.  The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) has defined the term temporary agricultural work as no more than 12 months or employment of a seasonal nature tied to a certain time of the year, event or pattern.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

There was-and-still-is a very regimented step-by-step process that  agricultural employers must follow to bring foreign farm laborers to work on their farms, ranches, meat packing plants or similar locations; which begins with a petition filed with their state workforce commission; then they go to the DOL for labor certification that there is a lack of available domestic workers to perform the intended project; once the employer receives the DOL Labor Certification they file a request with the Department of Homeland Security; and upon approval, the foreign worker petitions the Consulate’s Office in their country to obtain the H2-A Visa to come to America and work on a specific  temporary or seasonally project for less than 12 months.  The H-2A visa is valid for 3 years.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

This process has been relaxed and modified somewhat. Covid-19 has created the necessity to impose travel restrictions, stay at home orders and caused lots-and-lots of tremendous pain, loss and suffering throughout the country.  In response to anticipated disruptions and uncertainties in the U.S. food supply and the ongoing impact of the Covid-19 epidemic in rural America; the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published temporary amended regulations regarding temporary and seasonal agricultural workers and their U.S. employers in the H-2A nonimmigrant agricultural workers classification.  These final regulations are published in 85 FR 21739 and is effective from April 20, 2020 through August 18, 2020.The following are the major amendments to the normal process that historically were used by domestic farmers to bring foreign nonimmigrant workers to work temporarily on their farms, ranches, meat packing plants and other similar locations under the H-2A Agricultural Workers program:

  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to permit all H-2A employers to allow nonimmigrants who currently hold a valid H-2A visa status to start working upon the receipt of the employer’s new H-2A petition, but not earlier than the start date of employment listed on their H-2A petition.
  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to permit all H-2A workers to immediately work for any new H-2A employer, but not earlier than the start date of employment listed on the H-2A petition filed during the Covid-19 National Emergency.
  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to create a temporary exception to 8 CFR 24.2 to allow nonimmigrants to extend their H-2A period of stay beyond the three-year limitations without first requiring that the immigrant leave the United States and remain outside of the United States for an uninterrupted period of three months. It is important that an H-2A petition for an extension of stay with a new employer must have been filed with USCIS on or after March 1, 2020 and remain pending as of April 20, 2020.
  • H-4 nonimmigrants who are the spouses and children of an H-2A agricultural worker visa holders are beneficiaries of these same amendments noted in one through three above. H-4 visa holders’ admission and limitations of stay are dependent on the validity of the H-2A visa holders’ status and they must be otherwise admissible.

Moreover, as a practical matter, certain in-person interview requirements at the Consulate Offices have been eased during this Covid-19 National Emergency to facilitate foreign workers traveling into the United States.  H-2A workers fall under the ‘essential worker’ category of critical worker and probably are exempt from the stay-at-home, travel restrictions and other measures imposed by local, state and federal governmental agencies during this Covid-19 National Emergency.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

Foreign agricultural workers on H-2A visas are subject to the United States federal tax laws but they are exempt from withholding of U.S. federal income taxes, social security taxes and Medicare taxes on compensation paid to them for services performed in connection to their H-2A agricultural worker visa status.  If they receive more than $600 in compensation, the foreign nonimmigrant worker must receive a Form W-2 from their employer which exempts social security and Medicare taxes.  Typically, the worker files Form 1040-NR and the employer must report the wages of its agricultural nonimmigrant workers on Form 943, Employer’s Annual Federal Tax Return for Agricultural Employees and file all other appropriate tax returns with local, state and federal taxing authorities.   Most of the modified filing, payment and reporting deadlines announced by the U.S. Treasury and Internal Revenue Service during this Covid-19 National Emergency applies to H-2A agricultural workers and their employers.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Thinking About Taxes

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
March 07, 2020

Thinking About Taxes

Thinking about spending that money withheld from employees’ wages to take a tour of the world, pay other business expenses or house payments?  Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Section 7702!   Hear those alarm bells ringing!  Anyone required to collect, account for, and turn over to the United States Treasury and willfully fails to carry out this duty are subject to severe civil penalties and upon being found guilty of the felony of failing to collect, account for, and turn over can be fined up to $10,000 and spend up to five years in federal prison.  Payroll tax fraud is a serious crime that is commonly investigated by the IRS Criminal Investigation (CI) Division.  This unit of the IRS investigates all kinds of violations of the Internal Revenue Code.  CI along with the Financial Crimes Network investigates FBAR violations (these are U.S. persons with foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets who fail to timely and accurately disclose these holding on Form 114), money laundering (these are individuals or entities engaged in some kind of unlawful activity and endeavoring to get dirty money into the normal banking system) and other financial crimes.

 

Thinking about not filing that required income tax, gift tax or other federal tax return or providing fraudulent information the IRS?  Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Sections 7207 and 7203Hear those whistles blowing!  Anyone who intentionally gives false documents, which includes returns and any other written representation to the Internal Revenue Service and any of its employees knowing that its materially false or fraudulent is subject to civil fines and upon being found guilty of the felony of giving the Service false returns or other documents can be fined up to $10,000 (if individual) and up to $50,000 (if corporation), and spend up to one year in federal prison.  Multiples applies in that cumulative false statements, returns and documents can generate multiplication of the civil fines and additional years to the duration of the prison term.

 

Thinking about paying fewer taxes than is lawfully owed by engaging in creative accounting, leaving that or this item off the return while adding and dreaming about things that never happened? Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Section 7201Hear those gongs clanging! Anyone who intentionally attempts to evade or defeat any tax imposed under the Internal Revenue Code is subject to civil penalties up to $100,000 (if individual) and up to $500,000 (if corporation), and spend up to five years in federal prison upon conviction.

 

Thinking about taxes?  Stay away from the tumbling … lie.


This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432     

Remote Sellers Must Register in Texas before October 1, 2019

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
September 16, 2019

 

Remote Sellers Must Register in Texas before October 1, 2019

Texas imposes a 6.25 percent state sales tax and use tax on all retail sales, leases and rentals of most goods and some services that are either sold in Texas or used in Texas.  Cities, Counties and Transit Authorities can charge up to 2% sales tax on taxable goods and services.  This local sales tax varies from city to city, county to county and transit authority to transit authority throughout the state of Texas.   The maximum sales and use tax in Texas is 8.25 percent.

 

online retail sales

Remote sellers are required to begin sales and use tax collection on October 1, 2019 on their Texas sales.    The remote seller must collect the correct tax by using the Sales Tax Rate Locator.  For example if a remote seller sales a chest of imported cigars to a person residing in Dallas, Texas; they must collect 8.25 percent tax on the gross sale at the time of the sale.  If this same sale is made in another city of Texas the total collected tax could be lower.  It would not be higher because 8.25% is the maximum sales and use tax in Texas.  However, other types of tax obligations could be implicated in this hypothetical, such as, tobacco taxes and fees. Remote sellers doing business in Texas must register with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts before October 1, 2019 to fulfill their Texas tax responsibilities.  First, remote sellers must apply for a Sales Tax Permit pursuant to the Texas Tax Code.

 

remote seller

Once the remote seller is properly registered with the Texas Comptroller of Public Account and receive their sales tax permit, they will be advised by the Texas Comptroller as to whether they must report their taxable sales and use taxes on a monthly basis, quarterly basis or annual basis.  Monthly sales and use tax reports are due on the 20th day of each month following the reporting month.  Quarterly filers must file their sales and use tax reports on April 20th, July 20th October 20th and January 20th.  Annual filers must report taxable Texas sales and use taxes on January 20th for the previous year.

Out of State sellers or remote sellers are required to begin collecting sales and use tax from their Texas customers on October 1, 2019.  If the remote seller fails to register and report Texas Sales and Use Tax they will be subjected to the penalties, administrative actions, and judicial options available under the Texas Tax Code in enforcing the tax laws.  The TTC provides for civil and criminal sanctions against businesses doing business in Texas and not in compliance with their tax responsibilities.

 

Businesses out of Texas

Businesses, who run afoul of the Texas Tax Code and desire to comply with Texas tax laws, whether they are in Texas or someplace else in the world, could possibly qualify to voluntarily disclose under the Texas Voluntary Disclosure Agreement Process (VDA).  A company representative must initiate the process on behalf of an anonymous client who meets the threshold requirements by contacting the Business Activity Research Team (BART) in writing.  If the business has already been contacted by the Texas Comptroller regarding non-compliance with Texas Tax laws, the business cannot voluntarily disclose.  It should be noted that the VDA process is available for all types of taxes administered by the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts.  Some of the types of taxes that the Texas Comptroller is responsible for administering under the Texas Tax Code are as follows:

  • Sales and Use Tax
  • Hotel Tax
  • Franchise Tax
  • Tobacco Taxes and Fees
  • Battery Sales Fees
  • Cement Production
  • Boat and Boat Motor Taxes
  • Insurance Taxes
  • Manufactured Housing
  • Controlled Substances

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Taxpayers with Significant Tax Debts Can Lose Their U.S. Passports

By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
August 21, 2019

 

Taxpayers with Significant Tax Debts Can Lose Their U.S. Passports

 

Ever heard of the Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act of 2015?  Well, under FAST the IRS has the authority to notify the State Department of taxpayers certified as owing the federal government.  A significant tax debt is currently defined as a delinquent tax bill of $52,000 or moreThe FAST requires the State Department to revoke the delinquent taxpayer’s U.S. passport and limit the taxpayer’s ability to travel outside the United States.

 

Taxpayer’s who intend to travel outside the United States must negotiate with the IRS to get the delinquent tax certification lifted

 

Taxpayer’s who intend to travel outside the United States must negotiate with the IRS to get the delinquent tax certification lifted.  Until that happens the taxpayer could become stranded outside of the U.S. with a revoked passport, or be blocked receiving a passport for the first time or on renewal leaving them unable to travel out of the country for any reason.

 

taxpayers who have to travel abroad must responsibility deal with their federal tax obligations long before they need to travel; because other than option one, above (paying the tax debt in full), the suggested options take months and some of them even take years to resolve in negotiations with the IRS

 

The IRS has identified several ways taxpayers can avoid having the IRS notify the State Department of their seriously delinquent tax debt as follows:

  1. Paying the tax debt in full;
  2. Paying the tax debt timely under an approved installment agreement;
  3. Paying the tax debt timely under an accepted offer in compromise;
  4. Paying the tax debt timely under the terms of a settlement agreement with the Department of Justice;
  5. Having a pending collection due process appeal with a levy; or
  6. Having collection suspended because a taxpayer has made an innocent spouse election or requested innocent spouse relief.

The practical tiptaxpayers who have to travel abroad must responsibility deal with their federal tax obligations long before they need to travel;  because other than option one, above (paying the tax debt in full),  the suggested options take months and some of them even take years to resolve in negotiations with the IRS.

The following types of taxpayers have been exempted from the delinquent taxpayer certification requirements under FAST:

  • Taxpayers in bankruptcy proceedings;
  • Identity Theft Victims;
  • Taxpayers whom the IRS has deemed non-collectible;
  • Taxpayers located within a federal declared disaster area;
  • Taxpayers with pending Installment Agreement request;
  • Taxpayers with pending Offer in Compromise with the IRS; or
  • Taxpayers with an IRS accepted adjustment that will satisfy the debt in full; and
  • Taxpayer’s serving in a combat zone is not exempt from the certification rules, but the certification is postponed while they do their tour of duty in the combat zone.

 

Taxpayers with plans to travel abroad simply need to be aware of the fact that their plans can be totally upended if they owe the federal government more$52,000 or more in back taxes.

 

Taxpayers with plans to travel abroad simply need to be aware of the fact that their plans can be totally upended if they owe the federal government $52,000 or more in back taxes.  The $52,000 could be owed on personal income taxes or business taxes where the individual taxpayer has been found be to be a responsible party, such as in payroll taxes with respect to the trust fund penalty that usually applies to delinquent taxpayer who owns the business or even employees of the business responsible for deciding what vendors and suppliers get paid and when.  Also the $52,000 certification threshold can be reached for a single tax period or multiple tax periods combined.  Example No 1, the taxpayer owes the IRS $2,000 for 2009, $14, 000 for 2015, and $40,000 for 2018.  In this example the taxpayer is seriously delinquent and the IRS under FAST can certify them as seriously delinquent to the U.S. State Department.  Example No. 2, the taxpayer owns a windmill manufacturing company with twenty employees; their business slowed to a whisper in the third quarter 2019 and the business owner decided to pay office rent, utilities, employees and suppliers and not the IRS payroll taxes.  The IRS learns of this decision and finds the owner the responsible party under the germane tax section and access a $52,000 trust fund penalty on the owner.  In this case, the owner/taxpayer could be certified by the IRS as a seriously delinquent taxpayer under FAST.  The owner’s passport could be revoked or their passport renewal could be denied by the U.S. State Department.

 

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432