Tag Archives: taxes

Federal Tax Developments Related to Covid-19

By: Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
March 30, 2020

As you can imagine, things are changing and developing fast and furious during this Covid-19 Pandemic. Developments in taxes are no exception! Our law firm desires to keep our clients and others informed with regards to certain tax developments that might impact their businesses. In keeping with that desire, note some of the most significant recent federal tax developments:

  1. Tax Day now July 15, 2020: The U.S. Treasury and Internal Revenue Service automatically extended from April 15, 2020 to July 15, 2020 the federal income tax filing due date. The IRS gives affected taxpayers until the last day of the Extension Period to file tax returns or make tax payments, including estimated tax payments, that have either an original or extended due date falling within the Period. The IRS will waive any interest and late filing and payment penalties related to these late tax returns.
  2. Small and midsize employers can begin taking advantage of two refundable payroll tax credits designed to immediately and fully reimburse them, dollar of dollar, for the cost of providing Coronavirus-related leave to their employees.
  3. The CARES Act of 2020 enacted in response to Covid-19 provides employers with an employee retention credit in the amount of 50% of their wages impacted by closure due to Covid-19. Further the Act which became law on March 27, 2020 extends the due date for paying employer payroll taxes. Taxpayers must carefully review the law and properly compute the amount of payroll taxes that can be deferred; because it is not 100% deferral of all payroll taxes. Note: The Small Business Administration has announced that they are taking applications for disaster relief from small businesses with respect to loans up to two million dollars for monies borrowed to make payroll and pay rent during this Covid-19 Crisis. The application process and details regarding what businesses qualify and the procedures for applying can be found on the Small Business Administration website. The SBA has announced that they have relaxed some of their processing and documentation requirements to expedite the processing of these emergency loans to small businesses impacted by Covid-19. It appears that these SBA emergency loans could be converted to grants under certain condition(s). The IRS will waive the usual fees and expedite requests for copies of previously filed tax returns for affected Covid-19 taxpayers who need them to apply for benefits or to file amended tax returns claiming casualty losses. Watch our blogs as more changes may be forth coming in the area of employer relief due to Covid-19 closures. But for now, this appears to be the game plan regarding employers.
  4. “Existing Installment Agreements –For taxpayers under an existing Installment Agreement, payments due between April 1 and July 15, 2020 are suspended. Taxpayers who are currently unable to comply with the terms of an Installment Payment Agreement, including a Direct Deposit Installment Agreement, may suspend payments during this period if they prefer. Furthermore, the IRS will not default any Installment Agreements during this period. By law, interest will continue to accrue on any unpaid balances.” Source: IR-2020-59, March 25, 2020.
  5. The CARES Act eliminates the 10% early withdrawal penalty for Covid-19 related distributions from retirement accounts and make other rule changes regarding retirement account contributions.
  6. The Act relaxes certain corporate and individual charitable contributions rules and provides for an above the line deduction up to $300 for charitable contributions.
  7. Texas has been declared a Presidential Disaster Area related to Covid-19, so more specific rules and provisions could be developed by the IRS related to individuals and businesses with business operations in Texas or impacted by this particular Presidential Disaster Area Declaration.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader. You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

A Spouse May Be Relieved of Federal Tax Liability under Certain Circumstances

April 08, 2019
By Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant

 

Innocent Spouse Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

Texas is a community property state, which means that income earned by either spouse during their marriage is an item of community income.  Under federal tax law, each spouse is liable for federal taxes on community income regardless of which spouse earned the item of community income.

Under Internal Revenue Code Section 66(b), the Internal Revenue Service can modify the federal tax  outcome resultant from application of community property laws and charge only one spouse with respect to an item of community income if that spouse acted as if they were solely entitled to the  item of income; that is, they used it on themselves and not the community or household benefit,  and they did not notify their spouse of the item of community income before the due date for filing the spouse’s federal tax return for the applicable tax period.

 

Relief from Federal Tax Liability

 

 

This is only one of the many situations where an innocent spouse might be relieved of federal tax liability.  There is also, sometimes equitable relief available for innocent spouses even when the couple filed a joint tax return which created joint and severable liability for both spouses for the entire amount of the tax deficiency, penalties and interest due on the joint return.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432.

ONLINE RETAILERS LOOK OUT FOR TEXAS LIMITED SALES, USE & EXCISE TAX

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney, Certified Public Accountant
July 27, 2018

Online retailers have good reason to look out for the Texas Limited Sales, Use & Excise Tax.  Have you ever heard of South Dakota versus Wayfair, Inc.?    South Dakota vs. Wayfair, Inc., 585 U.S. ____ (2018) is a case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court on June 21, 2018.  In that case the Court decided in favor of South Dakota and against Wayfair, Inc.  Wayfair establishes a nationwide rule that basically allows all 50 States to lawfully tax the sales of goods and services performed by online retailers the same as they tax brick and mortar retailers.    Each State is permitted to change its laws governing transactions to realize this new source of revenue.  It is hard to imagine that Texas would not extend its sales, use and excise taxes to reach online retailers selling into Texas from other States or Countries.  The U.S. Supreme Court has given the States a green light to tax online retailers selling goods and services into their States from remote locations.

Online retailers have good reason to look out for Texas to extend the reach of its sales, use & excise tax rules to online retailers selling goods and services to consumers and businesses located in Texas.  In the past as it relates to brick and mortal retailers, Texas law presumed that all retail sales or uses of tangible personal property are taxable transactions.  The burden rested squarely on the shoulders of the brick and mortar retailers to show that sales were somehow exempt from sales, use and excise taxes.  Brick and mortar retailers are required by law to collect the tax and turn it over to the State of Texas pursuant to set rules and regulations.  These rules and burdens are most surely to extend to online retailers in the not so distant future when the Texas Legislature has had a chance to visit the issue after the South Dakota vs. Wayfair, Inc. decision.

Online retailers ought to watch, wait and plan their business activities in anticipation because the days when online retailers selling to consumers in Texas are numbered.    The Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts is the Texas governmental agency responsible for enforcing the sales tax rules in Texas.  Online Retailers need to perform due diligence and comply with Texas Limited Sales, Use & Excise Tax Act through voluntary disclosure and appropriate registrations.  Watch because the tax authorities cometh when you expect not.  Watch our blogs for future updates on this very important topic and other tax, litigation and immigration concerns of interest to our readers.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

VENDORS DOING BUSINESS WITH TEXAS AND HIRING UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS – BEWARE YOU MIGHT HAVE TO PAYBACK ALL PUBLIC SUBSIDIES PLUS INTEREST

By: Coleman Jackson, Attorney
August 27, 2015

VENDORS DOING BUSINESS WITH TEXAS AND HIRING UNDOCUMENTED WORKERS MIGHT HAVE TO PAYBACK ALL PUBLIC SUBSIDIES PLUS INTEREST

Texas Government Code §2264.051 stipulates that vendors doing business with any public agency, state or local taxing jurisdiction, or economic development corporation in Texas must certify in writing that the business, or a branch, division, or department of the business, does not and will not knowingly employ an undocumented worker.

The certification statement must also stipulate that if, after receiving a public subsidy, the business or a branch, division, or department of the business, is convicted of a violation under the Immigration and Nationality Laws of the United States, 8 U.S.C.A.  §1324a(f), the business will repay the amount of the public subsidy with interest, at the rate and according to the other terms provided by an agreement under Texas Government Code § 2264.053, not later than the 120th day after the date the public agency, state or local taxing jurisdiction, or economic development corporation notifies the business of the violation.  INA, 8 U.S.C.A. §1324a essentially deals with persons or entities that violate the U.S. immigration laws by hiring, or recruiting or referring for a fee for employment in the United States an undocumented person.  A person or entity charged with violations of 8 U.S. C.A. §1324a may establish that it has compiled in good faith with the requirements with respect to the hiring, recruiting, or referral for employment of an alien (illegal alien is the term used in the INA to refer to an undocumented person or a person who came to the U.S.A. without inspection or overstayed their visa) in the United States.  Anyway, If a person or entity charged with a violation under 8 U.S.C.A. §1324a, establishes an affirmative defense, a conviction could possibly be avoided, and the person or entity doing business with a Texas public agency, state or local taxing jurisdiction, or economic development corporation could probably avoid the penalty of repaying Texas all public subsidies received with interest under Tex. Gov’t Code §§2264.051-2264.101.

A public agency, local taxing jurisdiction, or economic development corporation, or the attorney general on behalf of the state or the state agency, may bring a civil action to recover any amount owed to the public agency, state or local taxing jurisdiction, or economic development corporation against any person or entity convicted of 8 U.S.C.A.  §1324a violations pursuant to Texas Government Code Section 2264.101.

Specifics regarding your company, workers, or government contracts should be discussed with legal counsel of your choice.  This overview is supplied for educational purposes, is only an overview, and do not create an attorney-client relationship with the Immigration & Tax Law Firm of:

COLEMAN JACKSON, PC
6060 North Central Expressway
Suite 443
Dallas, Texas 75206
Phone:  (214) 599-0431 English
Phone:  (214) 599-0432 Spanish
Website:  www.cjacksonlaw.com