Tag Archives: Tax

Podcast – Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses pt. 3 | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published January 27, 2021.

Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses pt. 3” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:
ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses- Part 3.”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our immigration legal assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses- Part 3.”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Reyna Munoz and I am the immigration legal assistant at Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Attorney we have published two prior podcast where we discussed various aspects of the tax relief offered to individuals and businesses in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. In Part One of Legal Thoughts Podcast  several weeks ago, we spent most of our time talking about stimulus checks.  Then in Part Two, we spent the bulk of our time discussing tax relief in the Act for businesses, such as the Paycheck Protection Program.  In this Part Three, we will be discussing Discharge of Indebtedness and the Paycheck Protection Program.

Question 1:

  • So, Attorney, let’s get started this morning with this question: Generally speaking, Attorney, what are the tax implications for discharge of indebtedness?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 1:

  • Good morning Reyna.
  • That is an excellent place to start before we get into the Paycheck Protection Program and the special rules of forgiveness of Paycheck Protection Program loans to businesses under the CARES Act and the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.
  • Generally speaking, under Internal Revenue Code Section 61(a)(11) and Treasury Regulations Section 1.61-12(a), a taxpayer that is discharged from paying a debt by a creditor must include the gross amount discharged in gross income for federal income tax purposes.  It is gross income because the taxpayer has received an increment in wealth; it’s the same as wages, or earnings or dividends or other forms of increase in wealth realized by a taxpayer.
  • There are several exceptions to this rule however, and the one we care about in this Podcast relates to the exceptions codified into law under the CARES Act and the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

  • That sounds interesting.

Question 2:

  • Could you explain in a nutshell when a Payroll Protection Program loan is qualified for tax-free loan forgiveness under the Covid-19 relief programs you have been discussing in these last three podcasts?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • Reyna, in a nutshell; whether a Paycheck Protection Program Loan is eligible for tax-free cancellation of debt treatment depend upon how much of the paycheck protection program loan amount was used for payment of payroll costs during a covered period.
  • Under the Original CAREs Act, paycheck protection program loan proceeds could be used to pay certain eligible business expenses, such as, payroll costs, utility payments, rent and interest on some mortgage obligations. All of this cost had to be incurred by the recipient of the loan.  Depending upon whether 75 percent or more of the loan proceeds were used on payroll cost during the covered period, some or all of the payroll protection loan was subject to forgiveness under the CARES Act.  Under the original CARES Act there were some questions as to whether the cancelation of the debt was taxable income under Internal Revenue Code Section 61.  Also, under the original CARES Act, the IRS issued rules that stated that the  business costs paid from the Paycheck Protection Act Loan Proceeds were not deductible by the business on their federal tax return.  However, Congress overruled the Internal Revenue Service in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 making all Payroll Protection Program Loans tax-free and Congress also ruled that the business expenses paid with the loan proceeds were fully deductible business expenses pursuant to normal Internal Revenue Code provisions.  These particular relief provisions in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 relates back to and applies to Payroll Protection Program loans under the CARES Act as well as those originating under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

  • Let me make sure I understand what you just said attorney! I think you said that when a Payroll Protection Program Loan is used to pay business operating expenses, such as, payroll costs, utility payments, rent, and certain kinds of mortgage interest, the Payroll Protection Program loan can be canceled tax-free to the business?  And the business can still deduct the business expenses paid using the loan proceeds on their annual federal tax return!
  • Did I get all that right, Attorney?

Question 3:

  • Attorney is the discharge of Payroll Protection Loan under the CARES Act automatic or do an application for forgiveness have to be filed somewhere?

 Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 3:

  • Reyna your summary of what I said is perfect. And no, the forgiveness of a Paycheck Protection Program Loan is not automatic.
  • The recipient must submit the appropriate application to the Small Business Administration through their financial institution.
  • Under the CARES Act, loan forgiveness request were filed on Form 3508 or 3508EZ depending upon the maximum amount of the loan forgiveness and certain other factors. Further all loan forgiveness applications have to be accompanied by credible business records and documents during the covered period supporting the business owners’ assertions in the debt cancellation applications.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney in a nutshell, what are the eligibility requirements for cancelation of the Payroll Protection Program Loan under the Consolidated Appropriation Act, 2021? I mean, Attorney are the rules, forms and steps to take for tax-free discharge of the debt the same as under the CARES Act?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 4:

  • Very well! Let me describe some of the differences or changes to the Payroll Protection Program Loan forgiveness rules, forms and procedures made by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.
  • Remember in our previous Podcast in Part 2, we explained how the eligible expenses paid from a Paycheck Protection Program Loan was expanded under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 to include expenses like, payment for business software and cloud computing services incurred due to covid-19, certain covered capital expenditures and certain covered worker safety measure expenditures; The key metric to keep in mind is this one: The Paycheck Protection Program is still essentially focused on maintenance of a business’ employees and staff.  Keep people employed– that in a nutshell is what PPP is about.  You can just go by the name of the program— that is, Paycheck Protection Program.  So, expenditure of at least 75% of the loan proceeds to maintain payroll during the covered period is still key to tax-free cancellation of the debt under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.
  • The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 made it simpler and easier for covered Paycheck Protection Program Loan requests from certain eligible recipients to be forgiven. Only a certification as follows need to be made by the loan recipient; and no substantiating documentation need to be filed with the certification:
  • An eligible recipient must submit to their lender a certification that attest that–
    1. a description of the number of employees they were able to retain because of the paycheck protection loan;
    2. Estimates of amount of the loan spent on payroll costs;
    3. Attest that they have accurately supplied items 1 and 2 and complied with Section 307, Simplified Forgiveness Application requirements of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 which requires retention of the employment records 4 years after submission of the forgiveness application and retention of all other pertinent records for a period of 3 years.
    4. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 states that the simplified loan application forgiveness form is not be any more than one page in length. These simplified PPP loan forgiveness procedures apply to Paycheck Protection Program loans in the amount of $150,000 or less.  The Section 307 Simplified Forgiveness Application provisions of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 applies to Paycheck Protection Program loans originating under the CARES Act or the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • That sounds like a solid way many businesses can keep their employees working during this dreadful pandemic. Attorney, Paycheck Protection Program Loan forgiveness is not subject to taxation, right.  I mean we started this podcast talking about discharge of indebtedness.

Question 5:

  • Is the cancelation or forgiveness by the Small Business Administration a discharge of indebtedness where the business will owe income taxes on the amount discharged? I need this to be clear; like in a nutshell; is it taxable income to the business or to the owner of the business?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • In a nutshell, Reyna!
  • Paycheck Protection Loans forgiven by the Small Business Administration is a statutory exception to the Internal Revenue Code Section 61.
  • In a nutshell, Paycheck Protection Program Loans that are forgiving or canceled by the Small Business Administration are tax-free to the business, to its owners, shareholders or partners.
  • Let me throw in this caution however, all business who apply for and successful obtain SBA cancelation of a Paycheck Protection Program Loan should maintain the required books and records because they might have to submit such records for audit inspection and examination up to four years after the loan has been written off by the government.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • That last point is an important one. Paycheck Protection Program Loans are Small Business Administration Loans.  SBA loans are subject to audit examination.

Question 6:

  • Attorney, what is the extent or scope of the likely audit examination?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • Businesses should consult with their trusted advisors when seeking forgiveness of these loans. The matters that we have been discussing are laws.  That is, we are explaining recent Acts of Congress in the government’s attempt to deal with the economic fall out and devastation caused by this dreadful global pandemic.
  • In answer to your question with respect to the scope of the audit; I really don’t know exactly, but for sure the business is going to have to most likely present evidence of eligibility for the loan and eligibility for forgiveness of the loan pursuant to any subsequent rules and regulations that the Small Business Administration, United States Treasury or other governmental agency might issue in the future. Businesses should keep good books and records that properly reflect the expenditure of Paycheck Protection Program loan proceeds for at least seven years.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • Attorney thanks for such a detailed explanation of discharge of indebtedness and the Paycheck Protection Program.

Reyna Munoz’s Concluding Remarks

  • Attorneythank you for this cogent presentation.
  • I know we have not talked about everything concerning the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. But these are my questions for now.  Perhaps we can do another podcast on this topic as time permits and interest by our listeners is communicated to us through calls, emails or otherwise.
  • Our listeners who want to hear more podcast like this one should subscribe to our Legal Thoughts Podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast. You can follow our blogs by going to our law firm’s website at cjacksonlaw.com.  Everybody take care for now!  Come back in about two weeks, for more taxation, litigation and immigration Legal Thoughts from Coleman Jackson, P.C., which is located right here in Dallas, Texas at 6060 North Central Expressway, Suite 620, Dallas, Texas 75206.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431; Spanish callers:  214-599-0432 and Portuguese callers:  214-272-3100.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 as it relates to Discharge of Indebtedness and the Paycheck Protection Program”. We might do future blogs or podcast dealing with the Exclusion of Entities Receiving Shuttered Venue Operator Grants under Section 7(a)(36) of the Small Business Act, 15 U.S.C. 636(a)(36).
  • If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C. Stay tune!  Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks and check our law firm’s website at www. cjacksonlaw.com to follow our blogs.  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration.  Until next time, take care..

Podcast – Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses pt. 2 | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published January 18, 2021.

Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Who is responsible to maintain minimum essential healthcare coverage?”You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses- Part 2.”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our immigration legal assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses- Part 2.”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Reyna Munoz and I am the immigration legal assistant at Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Attorney about a week or so ago, we had a conversation about tax relief offered to individuals and businesses in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. In the first Legal Thoughts Podcast, about a week ago, we spent most of our time talking about stimulus checks.  We had said that we would continue this conversation in a future podcast and primarily discuss benefits to businesses in the $900 billion Covid relief package.

Question 1:

  • But before turning to my questions dealing with business relief under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021; besides the $300 weekly federal unemployment compensation for people who lost their jobs due to Covid, and the $600 stimulus checks for certain individuals, are there any other significant benefits in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 for individuals or households?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 1:

  • Good morning Reyna.
  • Yes Reyna; let me briefly summarize some other significant benefits to individuals in the $900 billion dollar Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 that was passed by Congress on December 27, 2020.
    1. Families with children are eligible for the Child Tax Credit based on 2019 income rather than 2020 income.  This applies to both the determinations of eligibility for the earned income tax credit and the additional child tax credit.  These credits are designed to help low-income to modest income families with qualifying children.
    2. The threshold adjusted gross income (AGI) for determining the amount an individual or family can deduct in medical expenses was changed from 10 percent of AGI to 7.5 percent of AGI for tax years beginning in 2020.
    3. There are other minor benefits to individuals and families in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021; but, I think I have mentioned the major ones that people should watch out for in terms of seeing whether they personally are impacted by the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

  • So attorney let me summarize the benefits to individuals, families and households to make sure I understand what you are saying:
  • The unemployed due to Covid-19 is eligible to receive 11 weeks of $300 per-week federal emergency unemployment benefits on top of their state unemployment benefit.
  • With certain exceptions and limitations that you mentioned Attorney, individuals and families can be eligible to receive stimulus payments of $600 for each family member.
  • Families eligibility for the earned income credit and additional child tax credit is based on the families 2019 income.
  • And lastly, medical expense deductions starting in 2020 are based on adjusted gross income of 7.5 percent rather than 10 percent.

Question 2:

  • Attorney, attorney did I summarize the major benefits for individuals and families under the Consolidated Appropriations Act 2021 correctly? Is what I just said an accurate understanding of what you previously said?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • Reyna, you have a good ear. You basically heard me correctly.  The four points that you listed are the major benefits for individuals and families that I gleaned from the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021; but, keep in mind that the Act is very massive with numerous tax and none-tax provisions.  I am not going to try to cover that whole piece of legislation in a podcast.  We are merely pointing out some major high points that might be of interest to our listeners.
  • Before we turn to our discussion of businesses impacted by this legislation, let me just point out that the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 corrected the original Cares Act that created the unfortunate situation where couples using only one social security number was denied the stimulus payment under the Cares Act. Under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, couples using only a single social security number in their household and the other an Individual Taxpayer Identification Number or ITIN are eligible for the $600 stimulus payment under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

  • Thanks for pointing out that a second round of direct cash assistance payments of $600 for each family member may be available for mixed-status families where only one spouse has a social security number under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. That is good news where only one spouse has a social security number!

Question 3:

Let us now talk about businesses.  What is in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 that benefits businesses, such as, sole proprietors and independent contractors?  And what types of businesses are we talking about, Attorney?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 3:

  • Reyna; that is good direction to go in! We need to hit the high points of what’s in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 for businesses, such as independent contractors, sole proprietors, partnerships and other types of businesses.
  • The most significant benefit in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 is Title II—Continuing The Paycheck Protection Program and Other Small Business Support.
  • A Small Business Concern is defined in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 as it is defined in section 3 of the Small Business Act, 15 U.S.C. 632. Any business owner who are wondering whether they are a small business should consider reviewing section 3 of the Small Business Act.
  • The Act mandates that the Administrator of the Small Business Administration shall within 10 days after the Act becoming effective, draft, adopt and implement appropriate regulations to administer the provisions and laws established by Congress in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. Small business owners who think they might be eligible for any benefits under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 may want to consult with their banker, attorney or other trusted advisor immediately in preparation for the role out of  new SBA regulations implementing the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney how soon will the Small Business Administration issue the implementation regulations for the Consolidated Appropriation Act, 2021?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 4:

  • I am not sure with regards to the exact date or timing as to when the Small Business Administration will issue the regulatory framework or rules of the road in implementing the Paycheck Protection Act provisions of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. It is reported that the SBA is working on the regulations and guidelines.  What small business owners need to know at this time is that Congress authorized an additional $285 billion dollars for the Paycheck Protection Program and they specifically set business size limitations, a phase financial institution criteria where its suppose to start funding through community and small financial institutions typically used by minorities and others in depressed economic areas and then to major banking institutions who might not normally fund such areas, and Congress also expanded the types of qualified expenses that can be paid using the Paycheck Protection Program loan proceeds.  There are changes also made to the loan forgiveness procedures and lots and lots of other provisions in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 that benefits businesses.
  • The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 distinguishes between two broad groups: Let me just call them the “First Draw Borrowers” and the Second Draw Borrowers.
  • First Draw Borrowers are borrowers who did not participate in the original Paycheck Protection Program enacted in the original Cares Act. The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 requires first time borrowers to have less than 500 employees and their business operations must have been operational as of February 15, 2020.  The first draw  Paycheck Protection Program loan cannot exceed 2.5 times the small business average monthly payroll cost and cannot exceed $10 million dollars.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • That sounds great!

Question 5:

  • What are the terms and requirements in the Paycheck Protection Program for the Second Draw Borrowers?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 are for businesses that participated in the original Cares Act, Paycheck Protection Program.  Businesses can apply for a “Second Draw Loan” if they have spent or expect to spend the full amount of their first Paycheck Protection Program loan before they receive funding for the second loan.  They can also apply for a Second Draw Loan” whether they have applied for and received forgiveness of their First Draw Loan or not.  In general the small business must have 300 employees or less to be eligible to apply for a Second Draw Loan under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Paycheck Protection Program.
  • It should be noted that the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 increased the ability for Paycheck Protection Program borrowers to request an increase in loan amount due to updated regulations. This effects, such entities that did not accept their loan or returned the loan under the Cares Act.  Impacted entities should consult with their lender, attorney or other trusted advisor concerning making such requests under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 6:

  • Attorney what are the other eligibility requirements for the Second Draw Paycheck Protection Program Loan under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • The term eligible entity under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 is defined as a nonprofit organization, housing cooperative, veteran’s organization, tribal business concern, eligible self-employed individual, sole proprietor, independent contractor, or small agricultural cooperative that employs 300 employees or less.
  • The maximum amount of a Paycheck Protection Program loan made to an eligible small business that is assigned a North American Industry Classification System code beginning with 72 at the time of disbursal is the lesser of, at the election of the entity (1) the entities average monthly payroll cost in the year the loan is made, or (2) the entities average monthly payroll cost for the calendar year 2019 multiplied by 3.5 or a maximum of $2 million dollars. The NAICS Code 72 covers such business establishments as cafeterias, restaurants, drinking places, recreational camps, hotels, and generally any type of accommodations and food services establishment.  The business must have been operational as of February 15, 2020.
  • All other small businesses, with the exception of those with North American Industry Classification System Code of 72, which are accommodations and food services industry sector business cannot exceed 300 employees and their second draw loans are limited to 2.5 times the business’ average monthly payroll costs. The second draw loan cannot exceed $2 million dollars. The business must have been operational as of February 15, 2020.
  • Finally, all businesses applying for a second Paycheck Protection Program loan under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 must show that their business revenue declined by at least 25 percent in any quarter in 2020 compared to the same quarter in 2019.
  • Again, I want to stress that the Small Business Administration are still developing the regulations and implementation of the guidelines for the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. Therefore, some implementation particulars may change but the basic eligibility details are in the Statute itself.  Business owners could consult with their lender, attorney, or other trusted advisor in preparation for the role out of the Second Draw Paycheck Protection Program by the Small Business Administration.  And they can refer to the Small Business Administration website for updates about this program.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • Attorney thanks for such a detailed explanation of what kinds of businesses might be eligible to apply for a Paycheck Protection Program Loan under the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. Its eligible self-employed individuals, independent contractors, people with their own businesses too! And it sounds like, based on required computation models that you mentioned, Attorney; eligible individuals and business need to engage in some complicated computations in terms of determining what their qualified payroll costs are and computing the 25 percent decline in revenue and so forth.

Question 7:

  • Attorney, are there any limitations on the types of expenses a business can pay with a Paycheck Protection Program loan?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 7:

  • Yes, there are. First of all, the Paycheck Protection Program is for business expenses.  It is absolutely improper to use any of the funds for personal expenses or any other expenses not specifically associated with the business who applies for and receive the Paycheck Protection Program loan whether under the First Draw Loan or the Second Draw Loan.
  • Under the Cares Act, business expenses such as, payroll costs, rents, and utilities could be paid from a Paycheck Protection Program Loan.
  • The Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 expanded types of expenses that can lawfully be paid from the Paycheck Protection Program Loan to business expenses such as:
    1. covered operations expenditures, such as, payments for any business software or cloud computing services that facilitates business operations, delivery of services, and such;
    2. covered property damage cost related to property damage and vandalism or looting due to public disturbances that occurred during 2020 that was not covered by insurance;
    3. covered supplier cost for such things expenditure to a supplier of essential goods or services under contract, order or purchase order in effect during the Paycheck Protection Program coverage period; and
    4. covered worker protection expenditures which are capital facility expenditures to adapt a business establishment to comply with Department of Health and Human Services, the Center for Disease Control, local health authorities, or equivalent occupational safety standards and requirements beginning March 1, 2020 and extending to when the President declares the National Emergency resulting from Covid-19 has ended.
  • So as you can see, the types of eligible expenses that can be paid from the Paycheck Protection Program loan has been drastically expanded by enactment of the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021.

Reyna Munoz’s Concluding Remarks

  • Attorney, thank you for this cogent presentation.
  • I know we have not talked about the everything concerning the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021. But these are my questions for now.  Perhaps we can do another podcast on this topic in about two weeks or something.
  • Our listeners who want to hear more podcast like this one should subscribe to our Legal Thoughts Podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast. You can follow our blogs by going to our law firm’s website at cjacksonlaw.com.  Everybody take care for now!  Come back in about two weeks, for more taxation, litigation and immigration Legal Thoughts from Coleman Jackson, P.C., which is located right here in Dallas, Texas at 6060 North Central Expressway, Suite 620, Dallas, Texas 75206.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431; Spanish callers:  214-599-0432 and Portuguese callers:  214-272-3100.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about “Who is responsible to maintain minimum essential healthcare coverage?”. If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Stay tune!  Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks.  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate, and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation, and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Podcast – Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published January 11, 2021.

Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson, and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses.”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our immigration legal assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Update on Covid-19 Relief for Individuals and Businesses.”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Reyna Munoz, and I am the Immigration Legal Assistant at Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Attorney a lot of folks are receiving bills from the IRS claiming that they owe a “shared responsibility payment for failure to maintain healthcare coverage on members of their household”. I mean some of these bills are for tax periods that are a long time ago, like 2015, 2017 and 2018.  What is this about?
  • Question 1: Just tell me, what is this all about?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 1:

  • Good morning Reyna.
  • Yes Reyna; Congress recently passed and the President recently signed into law a $900 Billion Covid Relief Package with quite a few tax provisions.  The package includes $600 payments to individual taxpayers with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $75,000 or less or in case of head of households with adjusted gross income (AGI) of $112,500.  The new relief payment for joint return tax filers is $1,200 with AGI of $150,000 or less.  And taxpayers receive $600 for each qualifying child.  The new relief package also extended the weekly federal unemployment compensation of $300 for qualified individuals who lost their jobs due to Covid-19.”.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

Question 2:

  • Attorney, who qualifies for the recovery rebate tax credits or stimulus checks?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • Other than the adjusted gross income limitations that I mentioned, the following individuals are eligible to receive stimulus checks unless specifically ineligible:
  • Everyone is eligible other than —
  1. Any nonresident alien individual;
  2. Any individual with respect to whom a deduction under section 151 is allowable to another taxpayer for a taxable year beginning in the calendar year in which the individual’s taxable year begins; and
  3. Any estate or trust.
  • To summarize: Anyone who does not fall into either 1, 2 or 3 above is eligible to receive a stimulus check.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant

Question 3:

What is the substantial presence test?

 Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 3:

  • Reyna; that is an excellent question!
  • In United States Tax Law a nonresident alien is any individual who is not a United States Citizen and does not pass the Green Card Test or Substantial Presence Test.
  • To summarize: A Nonresident is anyone who is not
  1. a United States Citizen; or
  2. a Lawful Permanent Resident or Green Card Holder; or
  • a person who passes the substantial presence test with respect to length of physical presence within the United States. We go into detailed discussions of the substantial presence test in prior blogs which can be found on our website and in prior podcast as well.  So I will not go through this mechanical test again now.

 Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney how does an eligible individual apply for a stimulus check?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 4:

  • Well, taxpayers don’t exactly have to apply for stimulus checks.
  • Taxpayers who are eligible to receive a stimulus check will receive the check by direct deposit to any account to which the taxpayer authorized the IRS to send refunds or federal payments to on or after January 1, 2019. In the event the taxpayer does not authorize the IRS to direct deposit the stimulus check the United States Treasury will mail a paper check or debit card directly to the last known address of the taxpayer.  The law requires the Treasury to send out these payments as rapidly as possible.  Eligible individuals should already have received their stimulus check or should receive them pretty soon.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • That sounds easy enough; but Attorney!

Question 5:

  • How will the United States Treasury know the correct amount of money to send to the taxpayer?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • Excellent question!
  • The stimulus payment computations and eligibilities will be based on tax returns filed by taxpayers for the tax period ending December 31, 2019.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 6:

  • What should families do if they think they are eligible but they have not received a stimulus check at all or in the wrong amount?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • They should contact the Internal Revenue Service and inquire.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

  • Covid-19 has killed a lot of people. And also lots of people have died since December 31, 2019; my question is whether their heirs, such as, surviving spouses and children going to receive their deceased relatives stimulus payments. I am kind of wondering about this since the tax refunds or credits are based on tax returns filed for tax periods ending December 31, 2019.  Is that right!

Question 7:

  • Attorney, are the heirs of a deceased individual eligible to receive a stimulus check on behalf of the decedent?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 7:

  • The “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”. That is the official title of the United States Law that was recently passed by Congress that implemented the tax provisions we have been talking about this morning in this podcast.
  • Under the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”; any individual who was deceased before January 1, 2020 or in case of joint return, both taxpayers were deceased before January 1, 2020; the heirs of those taxpayers would not receive the stimulus payment.
  • Under the Act, any individual who dies after January 1, 2020 or in case of joint return, both taxpayers die after January 1, 2020, the lawful heirs of those taxpayers should be able to claim the stimulus payment. They might have to specifically make a claim with the IRS like you would normally in a decedent representative case. What I am saying is that I am not sure the U.S. Treasury would know to send the stimulus payment to a decedent’s heir or representative unless they are told of the decedent’s death.

Reyna Munoz’s Concluding Remarks

  • Attorney, thank you for this cogent presentation.
  • I know we have not talked about the $900 Billion Covid Relief Packages’ tax implications for businesses yet. Perhaps we can talk more about this and produce a future podcast or blog.
  • Our listeners who want to hear more podcast like this one should subscribe to our Legal Thoughts Podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast. Everybody take care!  And come back in about two weeks, for more taxation, litigation and immigration Legal Thoughts from Coleman Jackson, P.C., which is located right here in Dallas, Texas at 6060 North Central Expressway, Suite 620, Dallas, Texas 75206.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431; Spanish callers:  214-599-0432 and Portuguese callers:  214-272-3100.
  • English callers: 214-599-0431 and Spanish callers:  214-599-0432.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about “Updates on the Recent $900 Billion Covid Relief Package Recently Enacted Into Law. We talked basically about the Stimulus Payments in this blog; but there are many individual and business tax provisions in the “Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021”.  We could do several future podcast and blogs on this massive piece of legislation.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Stay tune!  Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks.  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Podcast – The Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published November 24, 2020.

The Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:
ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson, and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation, and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz, Immigration Legal Assistant, Leiliane Godeiro, Litigation Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our law firm’s Immigration Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz will be asking the questions and I will be giving the answers as she and I will be discussing: “What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”

Reyna Munoz Introduces Herself to the Audience:

  • Hi everyone, I am Reyna. I am the Immigration Legal Assistant at the tax, litigation and immigration law firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Right here in Dallas, Texas.
  • Hi Attorney; today we will be discussing the topic: What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?

Question 1:

  • Well, attorney what does the long-arm of the U.S. Tax Code mean anyway?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

  • Good morning Reyna. I think this is a fascinating topic; so let’s get started!
  • United States citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents (or commonly known as Green Card Holders) are required to pay taxes on their gross income, regardless of where it is earned or how it is earned in the world.  That basic rule is established in United States Code, Section 61(a); and explained in 26 Code of Federal Regulations, Section 1.1-1(b).
  • So, to answer your question, that is why it is often said by tax professionals that the U.S. tax code has long arms.  It can reach U.S. citizens and Green Card holders and their gross income from anywhere in the world.  These are very long-arms indeed!

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 2:

  • That is interesting! How would the United States Government find out about this gross income and these foreign interest of U.S. citizens and Green Card Holders?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 2:

  • S. citizens and Green Card Holders have a legal duty to voluntarily file appropriate tax returns and other informational materials with the U.S. government reporting their gross income and interests in financial accounts held overseas. Federal tax returns must be filed annually to report gross income (such as, Form 1040 (individuals), Form 1065 (Partnerships), Form 1120 (Corporations), Form 1041 (Estates).  All of these tax forms are filed with the Internal Revenue Service when applicable.  Further U.S. citizens and Green Card Holders with ownership interest or signatory authority of foreign accounts must complete Schedule B, Part III, Line 7 of Form 1040 their individual tax return discussing their interest or signatory authority over any foreign account during the tax period; and moreover, in the event the balance in any single account or combination of foreign accounts is greater than $10,000 during the tax period, the taxpayer must also file an FBAR with the Financial Crimes Network.
  • It will not be hard for the U.S. Department of Treasury to find out about taxpayers reporting obligations today with the technology that is in existence. In fact, it is easier today than ever for information to be shared by business entities, governmental entities and individuals in seconds around the world.
  • The U.S. Treasury has negotiated operating and reporting agreements with governments around the world to share directly or indirectly financial banking information of U.S. citizens and Green Card holders.
  • LET ME JUST SAY, IT IS EXTREMELY UNLIKELY THAT THE U.S. GOVERNMENT WILL NOT LEARN OF THESE EARNINGS AND FOREIGN ASSETS TODAY.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 3:

  • What can happen if a U.S. Citizen fails to report all of their gross income and fail to report their ownership interest in a foreign bank account?
  • First what is a foreign bank account anyway?

Attorney Answers Question 3:

  • A foreign bank account is an account in a foreign institution, or an institution physically located outside of the borders of the U.S. and its territories. Branches of U.S. domiciled banks located overseas are not classified as a foreign bank for FBAR reporting purposes or IRS purposes.
  • Individuals who fail to comply with U.S. laws can expect there to be a gradation of criminal and civil exposure. What I mean by that is in the United States criminal penalties and civil penalties for violation of the law are graded based on level of culpability.  This is also true with regards to failure to voluntarily comply with the U.S tax laws.  The U.S. tax code imposes varies kinds of penalties for violations, such as tax evasion, failure to file penalties, negligent filing penalties.
  • As for failure to report interest in foreign accounts, the IRS is permitted to assess and collect civil penalties against any individual who fails to report their interest in a foreign account on a timely filed FBAR.
  • I have written numerous blogs with regards to the penalty structure designed to hold tax cheats accountable.

 Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

QUESTION 4:

  • Attorney what could you at least explain what you mean by gradation of penalties?

Attorney Answers Question 4:

  • Okay, very well! Let me briefly describe what gradation of penalties means as it relates to failure to file a required FBAR.
  • If an individual’s failure to file an FBAR is deemed willful by the IRS, then the IRS has the discretion to assess a maximum penalty of $100,000 or 50 percent of the balance in the foreign account at the time of the violation. Whichever is higher is the collectable penalty.
  • Willfulness does not require actual knowledge of the duty to report interest in a foreign account. Reckless or careless disregard of their statutory duty to report their ownership or beneficiary interest in the foreign account is enough for the IRS assess and collect the penalty.
  • The IRS has been challenged in Courts around the country, and they have a pretty good betting record on winning the willfulness FBAR cases. Come on, just look; these cases are what lawyers routine call document cases. For example, (1) it’s easy to prove whether someone is a U.S. citizen or Green Card Holder because there is a U.S. birth Certificate or Naturalization  Certificate or Lawful Permanent Resident Card; (2) it’s easy to prove that the account is located outside of the U.S. and its territories because there are bank account statements; and (3) it’s easy to prove that the taxpayer filed a tax return failing to list the foreign bank account because there is Schedule B, Part III, Line 7 of IRS Form 1040.  Hey, three strikes and you are out.  Willfulness to violate the FBAR rules is not a very high burden for the IRS to carry in these FBAR violation cases.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 5:

  • Okay Attorney that sounds like three strikes. It might be hard to hit the ball.  But what about—
  • If the taxpayer hired a professional tax return preparer to prepare and file, the return? Could the taxpayer now say it was none willful?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 5:

  • Well it depends on all the facts and circumstances as to whether a skillful negotiated and advocate could make out a defense.
  • But the main thing everyone should take away is this:
  • Taxpayers are deemed to have constructive knowledge of and responsibility for the contents of their tax returns which are signed under penalty of perjury.
  • Where immigrants are involved who lacks the knowledge of the English language, cultural norms in terms of voluntary tax reporting, educational challenges and other capacity factors, in these circumstances skillful advocacy might manage to turn what appears to be a willful violation into a none willful violation of U.S. law. People with foreign gross income and foreign account interest need to do their due diligence in picking tax professionals in preparation of U.S. tax returns and compliance with FBAR requires because the penalties for failing to comply are rough regardless of the gradation of the penalties.

Interviewer: Reyna Munoz, Tax Legal Assistant

Question 6:

  • Okay, I think I understand.
  • Attorney, you mentioned voluntary disclosure. Is there a way a person can get this right even after they failed to property report their gross income or foreign account?

Attorney: Coleman Jackson

ANSWER 6:

  • Yes, the IRS has voluntary disclosure programs. But the Offshore Voluntary Disclosure Program or OVDP has ended and the IRS is no longer accepting taxpayers’ disclosures for failing to report foreign accounts under that program.
  • The various Streamlined Procedures Programs are still viable; but only if the violation is non willful. I have written blogs on this in the past and will not go into any more details here; other than, the taxpayer must make sure their actions were none willful because the IRS audits these submissions and if the IRS deems the actions of the taxpayer were willful violations rather than none willful violations, they could make a referral to IRS Criminal Investigations for possible referral to the U.S.  Justice Department.
  • The IRS also still have a FBAR only disclosure program that might be used by some taxpayers under appropriate circumstances.
  • Mayra, thanks for your questions on this topic. We have numerous blogs on foreign accounts on our law firm’s blog site.   We must go for now.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

THIS IS END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thank you for giving us the opportunity to inform you about What does the Long-Arm of the United States Tax Code Mean?”
  • We might discuss other aspects of this topic on gross income and foreign accounts matters in follow up podcasts or blogs in the near future.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C., subscribe to our podcast and stay tune!  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate, and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation, and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Podcast – Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax? | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Transcript of Legal Thoughts Podcast
Published September 02, 2020.

Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses, and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation, and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Mayra Torres, the Public Relations Associate of Coleman Jackson, P.C.   The topic of discussion is “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax?” You can listen to this podcast by clicking here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or wherever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:
ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
LEGAL THOUGHTS
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation, and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas
  • Our topic for today is: “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax?”
  • Other members of Coleman Jackson, P.C. are Yulissa Molina, Tax Legal Assistant, Reyna Munoz,Immigration Legal Assistant and Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate.
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our public relations associate, Mayra Torres will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Foreign Investments and U.S. Income Tax”

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

  • Good morning everyone. My name is Mayra Torres and I am the public relations associate at Coleman Jackson, P.C. Coleman Jackson, P.C. is a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based right here in Dallas, Texas. We help businesses, individuals and everyone with sales taxes,income taxes, gift and estate taxes and contracts drafting and negotiations and disputes and immigrants on a variety of business and family immigration matters from around the world.
  • Today Attorney we are discussing foreign investments and U.S. Income Tax Law. My first question is basic:

Question 1:

Are foreign corporations ever subject to U.S. income tax laws?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

Mayra, the simple answer is YES, SOMETIMES FOREIGN CORPORATIONS ARE SUBJECT TO U.S.INCOME TAX LAWS!

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

QUESTION 2:

  • Okay then, let me just change my question a little.
  • When are foreign corporations subject to U.S. income tax?

Attorney Answers Question 2:

A foreign corporation is taxed on its taxable income which is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 3:

  • Attorney what do you mean by the term “effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S.”?

Attorney Answers Question 3:

  • That is a very astute question! Think in terms of source of the increment or decrement of wealth of the foreign entity. What I mean is the term effectively connected with a trade or business in the United States means income, gain or loss incurred during a tax year from sources within the United States. The key to understanding the meaning of this term is the source of the income, gain or loss incurred by the foreign corporation. If the source of the income, gain or loss for the year is in the U.S., then the foreign corporation is engaged in a trade or business effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. and are subject to federal income taxation under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.
  • The application of this Code Section does not mean that the income, gain or loss have to come from a trade or business being conducted in the U.S. If the source of the income, gain or loss is in the U.S., Code Section 882 applies and the income, gain or loss is taxable.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 4:

  • Does the foreign corporation have to operate a business within the United States during the tax year in order for these rules to apply to income, gains or losses under Code Section 882?

Attorney Answers Question 4:

  • Yes, that is exactly right. In order for Code Section 882 to apply, the foreign corporation must be engaged in a trade or business within the United States during the particular tax year where the determination is being made whether income, gain or loss is effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the United States under Internal Revenue Code Section 882.
  • The Code Section 882 determination is made at the close of each tax year. If a foreign corporation has income, gain or loss at any time during a tax year from a source within the U.S. and its engaged in a trade or business within the U.S. whether it be in a joint venture or partnership or limited liability company or similar affiliation with a U.S. entity, it is taxable income effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. under IRC 882.

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 5:

  • Wow! Attorney that is a lot to digest; can we continue this conversation in another podcast because I have a lot more questions? For example, are there any categories of income, gain or loss considered effectively connected to the United States even if its earned overseas by a foreigner?

Attorney Answers Question 5:

Yes, there are categories of foreign source income that are subject to U.S. income taxation as effectively connected with the conduct of a trade or business within the U.S. But you are right Mayra that is enough to ponder for now. We can continue this topic in a later podcast in about two weeks. Please subscribe to our podcast.

Mayra’s Concluding Remarks

  • I am looking forward to continuing this topic in about two weeks!
  • Anyone interested in hearing more about foreign investments and U.S. Taxation should subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever they listen to their podcast.We also have a lot of blogs going deep into the details of U.S. tax law, litigation and immigration law topics on Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s website at cjacksonlaw.com.

 Coleman Jackson, Attorney’s concluding remarks:

THIS IS THE END OF “LEGAL THOUGHTS” FOR NOW

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about foreign investments and U.S. taxation. If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C. Stay tune! Watch for a new Legal Thoughts podcast in about two weeks.We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration. Until next time, take care.

Podcast – Did Your Families ITINs Expire In 2019? | LEGAL THOUGHTS

Published July 14, 2020

Did Your Families ITINs Expire In 2019

Legal Thoughts is a podcast presentation by Coleman Jackson, P.C., a law firm based in Dallas, Texas serving individuals, businesses and agencies from around the world in taxation, litigation and immigration legal matters.

This particular episode of Legal Thoughts is a podcast where the Attorney, Coleman Jackson is being interviewed by Mayra Torres, the Public Relations Associate of Coleman Jackson, P.C.

The topic of discussion is “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019:  Did your families ITINs expire in 2019.”  You can listen to this podcast here:

You can also listen to this episode and subscribe to Coleman Jackson, P.C.’s Legal Thoughts podcast on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify, Cashbox or where ever you may listen to your podcast.

TRANSCRIPT:

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson
Legal Thoughts
COLEMAN JACKSON, ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR AT LAW

ATTORNEY:  Coleman Jackson

Welcome to Tax Thoughts

  • My name is Coleman Jackson and I am an attorney at Coleman Jackson, P.C., a taxation, litigation and immigration law firm based in Dallas, Texas.
  • Our topic for today is: “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019: Did your families ITINs expire in 2019.”
  • On this “Legal Thoughts” podcast our public relations associate, Mayra Torres will be asking the questions and I will be responding to her questions on this important tax topic: “Potentially Over 2 Million ITINs Expired at the End of 2019: Did your families ITINs expire?”

Interviewer:  Mayra Torres, Public Relations Associate

Question 1:

What is an ITIN and who uses an ITIN?

Attorney Answers Question 1:

  1. Individual Taxpayer Identification Numbers or ITINs are used by people who have federal tax filing or federal tax payment obligations under U.S. federal tax law who are not eligible for a Social Security number.
  2. ITINs are used by many Texans who are not authorized to work in the United States because they do not have work authorizations issued by the Department of Homeland Security; therefore, these workers cannot obtain a Social Security number from the Social Security Administration. I point out that an ITIN cannot be used for work authorization purposes; it is solely to be used for tax compliance purposes.
  3. Many undocumented individuals who live and work in the United States use ITINs which are issued by the United States Treasury for tax purposes. Whole families quite often use ITINs to fulfill their tax obligations and many undocumented children also use ITIN’s so that their parents can take the child tax credit, earned income credit and other benefits offered to taxpayers in the Internal Revenue Code.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question No. 2

  • Oh, I see; thanks for giving me a full answer to my questions.
  • I have a few more questions…: Are ITINs like a Social Security Number; I mean Social Security Numbers issued by the Social Security Administration are assigned to a person for life, right?  How about the ITIN issued by the U.S. Department of Treasury?  Is an ITIN issued to a person for life too?

Attorney Answers Question No. 2

  • Those are extremely good questions, Mayra.
  • A Social Security Number issued to a person by the Social Security Administration is issued to them for life. That means a person receives only one social security number that they use their entire lives.  Most social security numbers are assigned when U.S. citizens are children.  They keep that number for life.
  • No, the ITIN is not issued for the life of the recipient. The U.S. Congress passed a law called “Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 (PATH Act) which became law on December 18, 2015.
  • The PATH Act modified U.S. Tax law, 26 U.S.C. Section 6109 as it pertains to ITINs in two major ways:
  • Number 1: ITINs that have not been used on a tax return for 3 tax periods expire.  For example, ITINs not used on a tax return in 2014, 2015, or 2016 expired December 31, 2017.  ITINs not used on a tax return for 2015, 2016 or 2017 expired December 31, 2018.  And ITINs not used on a tax return for 2016, 2017, and 2018 expired on December 31, 2019.
  • WARNING: Filing delinquent tax returns are extremely problematic because household ITINs expire by 3 years of none use automatically.  This is a major development regarding ITINs since the PATH Act became law in the United States.
  • Now, let me discuss the second major change to tax law by enactment of the PATH Act:
  • The PATH Act of 2015 authorized the Internal Revenue Service to develop and implement an annual rolling middle digit expiration schedule for all ITINs in circulation.
  • Under this rolling middle digit expiration schedule, the IRS makes an annual announcement listing the middle digits of ITINs which will expire end of that calendar year. This list of expiring ITINs is usually posted on IRS.gov and possibly in financial newspapers.
  • Since publishing the list of expiring ITINs over the years since the PATH Act, the IRS has announced that the following middle digit ITINs would expire if not properly renewed by the holder of the ITIN:
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 70, 71, 72 or 80 expired on December 31, 2017 if not properly renewed.
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 81, or 82 expired on December 31, 2018.
  • All ITINs with middle digits of 83, 84, 85, 86 or 87 expired on December 31, 2019.
  • Let me just say that the IRS announced on October 10, 2019 that these ITINs can be renewed if the holder files a Form W-7 with the proper paperwork. Moreover, the IRS also said that ITINs with middle digits of 70 through 82 that expired in 2016, 2017 and 2018 can also be renewed if the proper paperwork is filed.  So people should understand that they can renew an expired ITIN.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question 3:

Wow that is a lot!  It’s good to know that ITIN users can renew their expiring and expired ITINs.  So how are ITINs renewed?  I mean what does an ITIN user have to do to renew their ITIN?

Attorney Answers Question No. 3 

  • Those are good questions, Mayra.
  • The ITIN holder should have received an IRS Notice CP-48 alerting them to the fact that their ITIN was about to expire. This notice would have given them detailed instructions as to how to renew their ITIN.  This Notice however could have been sent to the address where they lived at the time they originally applied for their ITIN.
  • If they did not receive the notice and instructions, they can still renew their ITIN by filing IRS Form W-7 and complying with all the instructions listed in the W-7 Instructions.
  • I might add that ITIN users should check all of the ITINs used by the members of their household and renew all the ITINs in the household even though only one or two of them have expired. The renewal can be filed for all ITINs in a household; and what I mean about household, is mom, dad and minor children who all use ITINs because they are not eligible for social security numbers.

Interviewer:  Mayra, Public Relations Associate

Question No. 4:

  • This has been informative. One last question Attorney:
  • What can happen if an ITIN expires and is not timely renewed?

Attorney Answers Question No. 4:

  • Bad things are all but certain to happen:
  • Tax Refunds could very likely to be delayed
  • The family could be denied the child tax credit with all the potential year-after-year tax difficulties that could arise from falsely claiming the child tax credit
  • The earned income credit could be denied with all the potential long term implications from falsely claiming the earned income credit
  • Accuracy Penalties and interest could be assessed by the IRS for filing inaccurate tax returns.
  • To summarize: A taxpayers failing to renew an ITIN could lead to all kinds of difficulties with the Internal Revenue Service’s Exam Unit and Collections division. Taxpayers who use these ITINs must remain vigilant annually and check to see whether any of the ITINs used in their households are set to expire either because of expiration under the 3 year of none use rule or expiration under the IRS rolling middle digit expiration schedule.

Attorney’s Concluding Remarks:

This is the end of Legal Thoughts for now!

  • Thanks for giving us the opportunity to inform you about expiration of ITINs: It’s time to check Your ITINs because they might be expired or expiring soon.  If you want to see or hear more taxation, litigation and immigration LEGAL THOUGHTS from Coleman Jackson, P.C.  Subscribe on Apple Podcast, Google Podcast, Spotify or wherever you listen to your podcast.  Stay tune!  We are here in Dallas, Texas and want to inform, educate and encourage our communities on topics dealing with taxation, litigation and immigration.  Until next time, take care.

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers on American Farms During Covid-19 National Emergency

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
May 14, 2020

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

The H-2A nonimmigrant visa classification has been around for a very long time.  See Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) 101(a)(15)(ii)(a), 8 U.S.C. 1101.  The H-2A foreign agricultural workers visa; known as H-2A is more in the public eye right now due to the media’s focus on the rise of Covid-19 cases in meat packing plants, on farms and in rural America potentially resulting in food supply chain disruptions.  The concern of the coronavirus’ disruption of the food supply is very real and it is of grave concern to the well being of farmers’ bringing their goods to market and to their fellow citizens ability to feed their families.  In a nutshell, the foreign agricultural workers program known as the H-2A Visa permits agricultural employers to fill shortages in the available work force by following certain procedures to lawfully bring foreigners to the United States temporarily to perform temporary or seasonal agricultural work.  The Department of Homeland Security defers to the U.S. Department of Labor with respect to defining what work falls into the categories of temporary and seasonal agricultural work.  Historically, the Department of Labor has defined “agricultural labor” as such duties as hauling and delivery on the farm, harvesting, cultivating and planting seed.  Foreign workers on H-2A Visas has historically also worked as sheep herders, goat tenders, cattle raisers, poultry farmers and in other occupations typically in rural areas of America where various kinds of animals are raised for market.  The point is that agricultural workers are not limited to farms performing task around a farm; foreign workers on H-2A Visas work on plantations, ranches, nurseries, meat packing plants, greenhouses, orchards, and as truck drivers and delivery drivers on these or other similar locations.  The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) has defined the term temporary agricultural work as no more than 12 months or employment of a seasonal nature tied to a certain time of the year, event or pattern.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

There was-and-still-is a very regimented step-by-step process that  agricultural employers must follow to bring foreign farm laborers to work on their farms, ranches, meat packing plants or similar locations; which begins with a petition filed with their state workforce commission; then they go to the DOL for labor certification that there is a lack of available domestic workers to perform the intended project; once the employer receives the DOL Labor Certification they file a request with the Department of Homeland Security; and upon approval, the foreign worker petitions the Consulate’s Office in their country to obtain the H2-A Visa to come to America and work on a specific  temporary or seasonally project for less than 12 months.  The H-2A visa is valid for 3 years.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

This process has been relaxed and modified somewhat. Covid-19 has created the necessity to impose travel restrictions, stay at home orders and caused lots-and-lots of tremendous pain, loss and suffering throughout the country.  In response to anticipated disruptions and uncertainties in the U.S. food supply and the ongoing impact of the Covid-19 epidemic in rural America; the Department of Homeland Security and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) published temporary amended regulations regarding temporary and seasonal agricultural workers and their U.S. employers in the H-2A nonimmigrant agricultural workers classification.  These final regulations are published in 85 FR 21739 and is effective from April 20, 2020 through August 18, 2020.The following are the major amendments to the normal process that historically were used by domestic farmers to bring foreign nonimmigrant workers to work temporarily on their farms, ranches, meat packing plants and other similar locations under the H-2A Agricultural Workers program:

  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to permit all H-2A employers to allow nonimmigrants who currently hold a valid H-2A visa status to start working upon the receipt of the employer’s new H-2A petition, but not earlier than the start date of employment listed on their H-2A petition.
  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to permit all H-2A workers to immediately work for any new H-2A employer, but not earlier than the start date of employment listed on the H-2A petition filed during the Covid-19 National Emergency.
  • The H-2A regulations were temporarily amended to create a temporary exception to 8 CFR 24.2 to allow nonimmigrants to extend their H-2A period of stay beyond the three-year limitations without first requiring that the immigrant leave the United States and remain outside of the United States for an uninterrupted period of three months. It is important that an H-2A petition for an extension of stay with a new employer must have been filed with USCIS on or after March 1, 2020 and remain pending as of April 20, 2020.
  • H-4 nonimmigrants who are the spouses and children of an H-2A agricultural worker visa holders are beneficiaries of these same amendments noted in one through three above. H-4 visa holders’ admission and limitations of stay are dependent on the validity of the H-2A visa holders’ status and they must be otherwise admissible.

Moreover, as a practical matter, certain in-person interview requirements at the Consulate Offices have been eased during this Covid-19 National Emergency to facilitate foreign workers traveling into the United States.  H-2A workers fall under the ‘essential worker’ category of critical worker and probably are exempt from the stay-at-home, travel restrictions and other measures imposed by local, state and federal governmental agencies during this Covid-19 National Emergency.

 

Foreign Agricultural H-2A Visa Workers

Foreign agricultural workers on H-2A visas are subject to the United States federal tax laws but they are exempt from withholding of U.S. federal income taxes, social security taxes and Medicare taxes on compensation paid to them for services performed in connection to their H-2A agricultural worker visa status.  If they receive more than $600 in compensation, the foreign nonimmigrant worker must receive a Form W-2 from their employer which exempts social security and Medicare taxes.  Typically, the worker files Form 1040-NR and the employer must report the wages of its agricultural nonimmigrant workers on Form 943, Employer’s Annual Federal Tax Return for Agricultural Employees and file all other appropriate tax returns with local, state and federal taxing authorities.   Most of the modified filing, payment and reporting deadlines announced by the U.S. Treasury and Internal Revenue Service during this Covid-19 National Emergency applies to H-2A agricultural workers and their employers.

This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432

Thinking About Taxes

By:  Coleman Jackson, Attorney & Certified Public Accountant
March 07, 2020

Thinking About Taxes

Thinking about spending that money withheld from employees’ wages to take a tour of the world, pay other business expenses or house payments?  Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Section 7702!   Hear those alarm bells ringing!  Anyone required to collect, account for, and turn over to the United States Treasury and willfully fails to carry out this duty are subject to severe civil penalties and upon being found guilty of the felony of failing to collect, account for, and turn over can be fined up to $10,000 and spend up to five years in federal prison.  Payroll tax fraud is a serious crime that is commonly investigated by the IRS Criminal Investigation (CI) Division.  This unit of the IRS investigates all kinds of violations of the Internal Revenue Code.  CI along with the Financial Crimes Network investigates FBAR violations (these are U.S. persons with foreign bank accounts and other foreign assets who fail to timely and accurately disclose these holding on Form 114), money laundering (these are individuals or entities engaged in some kind of unlawful activity and endeavoring to get dirty money into the normal banking system) and other financial crimes.

 

Thinking about not filing that required income tax, gift tax or other federal tax return or providing fraudulent information the IRS?  Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Sections 7207 and 7203Hear those whistles blowing!  Anyone who intentionally gives false documents, which includes returns and any other written representation to the Internal Revenue Service and any of its employees knowing that its materially false or fraudulent is subject to civil fines and upon being found guilty of the felony of giving the Service false returns or other documents can be fined up to $10,000 (if individual) and up to $50,000 (if corporation), and spend up to one year in federal prison.  Multiples applies in that cumulative false statements, returns and documents can generate multiplication of the civil fines and additional years to the duration of the prison term.

 

Thinking about paying fewer taxes than is lawfully owed by engaging in creative accounting, leaving that or this item off the return while adding and dreaming about things that never happened? Don’t do it before reading Internal Revenue Code Section 7201Hear those gongs clanging! Anyone who intentionally attempts to evade or defeat any tax imposed under the Internal Revenue Code is subject to civil penalties up to $100,000 (if individual) and up to $500,000 (if corporation), and spend up to five years in federal prison upon conviction.

 

Thinking about taxes?  Stay away from the tumbling … lie.


This law blog is written by the Taxation | Litigation | Immigration Law Firm of Coleman Jackson, P.C. for educational purposes; it does not create an attorney-client relationship between this law firm and its reader.  You should consult with legal counsel in your geographical area with respect to any legal issues impacting you, your family or business.

Coleman Jackson, P.C. | Taxation, Litigation, Immigration Law Firm | English (214) 599-0431 | Spanish (214) 599-0432